Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers

By Stuart Brown; Diané Collinson et al. | Go to book overview

I

Iberico y Rodriguez, Mariano

Peruvian, b: 1893. d: 1974. Cat: Speculative metaphysician. Ints: Epistemology; aesthetics. Infls: Bergson, Blondel and Klages. Appts: Professor of the History of Philosophy, University of San Marcos, Lima (successor there to Deústua).


Main publications:
(1919) Lafilosofia de Bergson.
(1926) El nuevo absolute.
(1929) El viaje del espíritu.
(1932) La unidad dividida.
(1933) (with Honorio Delgado) Psicologia.
(1939) El sentimiento de la vida cósmica.
(1950) La aparición. Ensayo sobre elsery elaparecer, Lima: Imprenta Santa Maria.
(1958) Perspectivas sobre'El Tema del Tiempo' (essays), Lima: Universidad Nacional Mayor de san Marcos.
(1965) Estudio sobre la metafora, Lima: Casa de la Cultura del Peru.
(1969) El espacio humano, Lima: Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos .
(1971) La aparición historica, Lima: Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

Secondary literature:
Homenaje a Mariano Iberico (1973), Lima: Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos.

Iberico's thought is focused on the problems arising from the concepts of one and many, being and appearance. This is evident in his earlier works, where the study of Bergson led him to an endeavour to show the unity of metaphysics and aesthetics, which in his view have a common root. This unity is evident, he argues, in what he terms the sense of cosmic life ('sentimiento de la vida cósmica', cf. 1939). This sense is based on, but transcends, aesthetic experience.

These problems are given their most original treatment in the book of 1950, Iberico's major work. Here he argues that there are three ultimate ontological classes: being, which is being in-itself; appearance; and the reflection of appearance in consciousness. These classes are intimately related in the concrete structure of existence, and mutually imply and give rise to one another. Appearance has generally been regarded as a veil of Maya between the soul and being, an obstacle to be overcome, but for Iberico this view rests on a false understanding of the relation between being and appearance. Appearance is no mere epiphenomenon, but it is itself the mode of being of being, el modo de ser del ser (1950, p. 175), the universal language in which being expresses itself. On the question of why being should manifest itself as appearance, Iberico contends that inherent in being is a property of dynamism which has been variously labelled eros or caritas. An understanding of the movement from one to many, however, is not possible for the mind restricted to conceptual thought. Iberico contends that we can achieve an intuitive apprehension of what there is in its primitive authenticity.

ROBERT WILKINSON


Idel, Moshe

Israeli, b: 1947, Timisoara, Romania. Cat: Philosopher of Jewish mysticism. Ints: Kabbalah; comparative religious philosophy; philosophy of language; anthropology. Educ: PhD, 1976, Hebrew University. Infls: Kabbalistic texts, Renaissance studies, the Jewish mystical tradition, comparative mysticism and Gershom Scholem. Appts: Lecturer, Associate Professor, then Professor, of Jewish Mysticism, Hebrew University, Jerusalem; Visiting Professor, Harvard University and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, 1976.


Main publications:
(1988) The Mystical Experience in Abraham Abulafia, trans. J. Chipman, Albany: SUNY Press.
(1988/90) Kabbalah: New Perspectives, 2nd ed., New Haven: Yale University Press.
(1988) Language, Tor ah and Hermeneutics in Abraham Abulafia, trans. M. Kallus, Albany: SUNY Press.
(1988) Studies in Ecstatic Kabbalah, Albany: SUNY Press.

-361-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Philosophers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • List of Abbreviated Sources xvi
  • List of Schools and Movements xxi
  • A 1
  • Main Publications: 19
  • Main Publications: 22
  • Main Publications: 24
  • Main Publications: 25
  • Main Publications: 29
  • B 41
  • Main Publications: 97
  • C - Cabral, Amilcar Lopes 119
  • Main Publications: 148
  • D 167
  • E 209
  • F 222
  • G 261
  • H 296
  • Main Publications: 323
  • Main Publications: 330
  • I 361
  • Main Publications: 365
  • J 370
  • Main Publications: 385
  • K 387
  • Main Publications: 405
  • Main Publications: 423
  • L 425
  • M 486
  • Main Publications: 491
  • Main Publications: 498
  • Main Publications: 540
  • N 558
  • Main Publications: 577
  • O 583
  • P 593
  • Main Publications: 605
  • Main Publications: 614
  • Main Publications: 626
  • Q 640
  • R 644
  • Main Publications: 657
  • S 690
  • Main Publications: 701
  • Main Publications: 704
  • T 764
  • U 795
  • V 800
  • W 817
  • Main Publications: 827
  • Main Publications: 833
  • Main Publications: 851
  • X 853
  • Y 857
  • Z 861
  • Guide to Schools and Movements 876
  • Bibliography 893
  • Nationality Index 903
  • Category Index 909
  • Index of Interests 918
  • Index of Influences 925
  • Index of People 936
  • Index of Subjects 945
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 947

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.