Transforming Rural China: How Local Institutions Shape Property Rights in Rural China

By Chih-Jou Jay Chen | Go to book overview

5

Southern Fujian under economic reforms

For three decades the southern coastal province of Fujian suffered under economic degradation. As the front-line in the ongoing conflict with Taiwan, just 130 kilometers offshore, Fujian had been designated as a military bastion. With Jinmen and Matsu, two islands under Taiwan's jurisdiction, and just a stone's throw from the Fujian shore, launching regular artillery attacks, the central Chinese government feared destruction on a large scale, and thus limited industrial investment projects in favor of more protected areas. In fact, since the establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949, through the beginning of economic reforms in 1979, Fujian failed to get even one major investment project. Such factors made its economic development fall below the national average, and lag far behind other coastal provinces. During this period, Fujian received but 1.5 percent of the country's total capital investment, the fourth lowest among the 29 provinces. From 1957 to 1975, Fujian's contribution to the national income declined from 1.56 percent to 1.26 percent, remaining the poorest of China's coastal provinces (He 1991:160; Shieh 2000).

The sparse industrial investment that did come to Fujian was located away from coastal areas. Despite their traditional prosperity, the frontline cities of Xiamen and Quanzhou were starved of industrial investment from the 1950s through the 1970s. The richest and most industrialized city in 1978 in Fujian, in terms of industrial output per capita and rural income per capita, was Sanming, a western inland state-designated industrial center with the province's only integrated iron-and-steel complex and several chemical and machinery plants. To a considerable extent, over these three decades, Fujian was a lopsided planned economy, forcefeeding the interior and starving the coast.

While military conflict retarded the province's industrial advancement, mountainous topography hindered its agriculture and transportation development. With 87 percent of total land area made up of mountains and highlands, industrial and commercial activities were concentrated in less than 10 percent of total land area, chiefly along the coast and plains. In 1978, cultivated area per capita in Fujian, was only 0.06 hectares, or half

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Transforming Rural China: How Local Institutions Shape Property Rights in Rural China
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Explaining Property Rights Transformations 7
  • Part I - The Yangtze Delta Property Rights Transformations 31
  • 2 - The Yangtze Delta in the Reform Era 33
  • 3 - The Yangtze Delta in the Postreform Era 70
  • 4 - Shuang Village 100
  • Part II - Southern Fujian Property Rights Transformations 125
  • 5 - Southern Fujian Under Economic Reforms 127
  • 6 - Hancun Village 160
  • 7 - Conclusion 178
  • Notes 188
  • Bibliography 194
  • Index 208
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 213

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.