From Becket to Langton: English Church Government, 1170- 1213

By C. R. Cheney | Go to book overview

II
THE BISHOPS

THE subject of this lecture is the bishops of England in the generation after Becket. Here to begin with is a contemporary's comment: 'I do not say that bishops cannot be saved; but I do say that in these days it is harder for bishops than for other men to be saved.' One grows so tired of hearing John of Salisbury's doubts about the salvation of archdeacons that it is refreshing to find an archdeacon hitting back. The words are from the Gemma ecclesiastica of Gerald of Wales.1 The office of a bishop in the Middle Ages--as at other times--exposed its holder to many dangers and temptations. These were pointed out with special emphasis by monks who, like St. Bernard, had sought the safety of the cloister and by certain seculars, like Gerald of Wales and Peter of Blois, who had not reached the episcopal bench. The bishop was a servant of the servants of God (for the title was not originally reserved for the pope alone2) and he was debtor for the souls of his flock; but he was also a trustee of church property and a lord. You had only to read Gregory the Great to realize that saintliness without tact, and other-worldliness without what is nowadays styled managerial ability are sorry qualifications for one who has to rule a diocese or province of the Church. In other words, a bishop must have a head for business. Yet he must not let his spiritual fervour be damped. In the twelfth century the difficulty was all the greater since government was becoming more and more complex and required a high degree of professionalism. Kings were prone to make bishops their ministers and to treat bishoprics as rewards for civil servants. It was, of course, a very old

____________________
1
Opp., ii. 359.
2
St. Wulfstan and St. Anselm used it. See L. Levillain, in Le Moyen Age, xl ( 1930), 5-7.

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Becket to Langton: English Church Government, 1170- 1213
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Abbreviations ix
  • I - Introduction 1
  • II - The Bishops 19
  • III - England and Rome 42
  • IV - Church and State 87
  • V - The Diocese 119
  • VI - The Laity 155
  • Appendix I - Providees and Italians in English Benefices 178
  • Appendix II - Early Vicarages in the Diocese of Lincoln 182
  • Appendix III - Selected Documents 186
  • Index 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.