Taking Back the Academy! History of Activism, History as Activism

By Jim Downs; Jennifer Manion | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Bench Talk

JIM DOWNS

JENNIFER MANION

The voice of a student activist announcing the time for the annual "Take Back the Night" rally resonates across the college green. It is one of those days when the campus seems alive and bursting with energy. Wherever you look, people are enjoying one of the first days of spring. Underneath the large oak tree, in front of the library-within view of Frisbee tossing, students sunning, and activists strategizing-we like to sit on our favorite bench and discuss ideas from our lectures and seminars. Today, we are discussing the ideology of pro-slavery thought in the United States antebellum South. Inspired by a lecture given by one of our favorite professors, we are on the lookout for her to pass by and settle our pressing question of the day, "Was James Henry Hammond a racist?"

It was on the bench, with each other, in front of the imaginary cameras that recorded our daily talk show, Benchtalk, that we held our own class. We spouted out positions we were too shy to take in class. We took on the ideas of our professors and our classmates and argued them into the ground. It was on the bench, not inside a classroom, that we began to realize that we would not join our classmates in corporate America, but instead would pursue academic and activist work. Jen already devoted a significant amount of time to lesbian and feminist groups on campus and in the city, while Jim worked as a research assistant and became heavily involved in some of our mentoring professors' fights for tenure.

Unlike many of our classmates, our introduction to the world of ideas and intellectual debate excited us. We wanted to know more, debate more,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taking Back the Academy! History of Activism, History as Activism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 221

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.