Taking Back the Academy! History of Activism, History as Activism

By Jim Downs; Jennifer Manion | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12

Producing for Use and Teaching the Whole Student

Can Pedagogy Be a Form of Activism?

KATHLEEN M.BROWN

TRACEY M.WEIS


Preface

Although this chapter focuses on pedagogy as a form of activism, the authors met in an archive in Richmond, Virginia in 1988. Research, scholarship, and the production of knowledge have all served as a backdrop for the friendship that subsequently blossomed. By coincidence, both of us moved to the same Pennsylvania town, just blocks away from each other, in 1993. Over the years, our friendship has included conversations about new books, teaching methods, research projects, and our efforts to balance these academic and political passions with our personal lives. For both of us, these lives revolve around families with children. Each of us makes her living as an academic at an institution for higher learning in Pennsylvania. Each of us has spent numerous research hours recovering the history of slavery and the experience of enslaved people in eastern North America. As important as these similarities are, they should not obscure our view of the differences in our situations. While both of us have experienced professional pressures to publish in conventional formats, Kathy's institution, University of Pennsylvania, requires a light teaching load and supports sabbatical leaves necessary for completing research projects destined for these conventional forms of publication. Tracey, in contrast, carries a heavy teaching load with little opportunity for a research leave. At Millersville University, publication is

-161-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taking Back the Academy! History of Activism, History as Activism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 221

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.