Taking Back the Academy! History of Activism, History as Activism

By Jim Downs; Jennifer Manion | Go to book overview

Index

a
A
Abstract questions, 193
Academic freedom, 194
Academic labor markets
job crisis, 71
mass media, 59
Academic life, anti-political feelings, 85 - 86
Academic organizing movements, 57 - 66 , 88 ,
see also Graduate student unionization
abuses of police power, 62 - 63
administration hostility, 71 - 72
administration propaganda, 75 - 76
anti-union campaigns, 69 - 82
anti-union student organization, 80 - 82 , 89
Columbia University, 70 - 78
faculty, 76 - 78
grassroots organizing, 73
legal recognition, 72
lessons for academics, 66
as new vision of academia, 73
personal history, 69
universities' mission, 62
values, 81 - 82
Academic star systems, 128
Activism,
see also Student activism
activists' accusal, 3
criticism, 191 , 192
need for scholarship, 191 - 193
reaction against by students, 85 - 86
scholarship as, xii uses, 188 , 189 - 190
voluntary retirement, 190
Activist pedagogy, 162 , 173
Afghanistan attack, 130 - 131
anti-war movement, 134
feminism, 130 - 131 , 133
opposition, 135 - 136
African American studies, 173 , 177 - 185
curriculum reform, 179 - 180 , 181
identity politics, 178 , 183 , 184 - 185
lack of access, 178
literature as history, 181 - 182
literature in secondary schools, 178 , 179 - 185
personal history, 178
reasons for teaching, 177 - 178
AIDS drugs, 59 - 60
Alliance of Radical Academic and Intellectual Organizations, Iraq war, 194 , 197 - 198
AllLearn, 60
American exceptionalism, 130
Anti-retroviral drug d4T, 59 - 60
Anti-union consultants, 80
Anti-war activism, 116
Afghanistan, 134
Iraq war, 134
Asbestos, 111

b
B
B-1BVisas, 78
Bayh-Dole Act, 59
Berenson, Lori, 13
Berkshire Conference for Women Historians, 164
Berkshire Conference on Women's History, 190
Bhopal, India, 106
Bill of Rights, 138 , 139
Bloch, Marc, 202 - 203
Bradley Foundation, 119
Bristol Meyers Squibb, 60
Brown University
anti-union campaign, 78 - 79
anti-union campaign justification by administrators, 79
pro-union faculty, 79

-215-

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