A Century of Genocide: Critical Essays and Eyewitness Accounts

By Samuel Totten; William S. Parsons et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Above all, we wish to sincerely thank all of the contributors to this book. All are extremely busy and dedicated scholars, and we greatly appreciate their contributions. At Routledge, we wish to thank our initial editor, Eric Nelson, for his interest in publishing the second edition of this volume, and we also wish to thank Robert Tempio, our new editor, and Angela Chnapko.

We also wish to thank Dr. George McCleary and his students in the Geography Department at the University of Kansas for the research, thought, and hard work they put into the development of the maps that accompany each of the case studies of genocide in this new edition of Century of Genocide.

As we did in the first edition, we wish to thank Kristy L. Brosius and the late Sybil Milton for their excellent work in translating court testimonies that appear in Chapter 6, "Holocaust: The Genocide of Disabled Peoples." With Rouben Adalian, we offer a heartfelt thanks to Donald E. Miller and Lorna Touryan Miller for granting us permission to publish several of the interviews they conducted with survivors of the Armenian genocide. René Lemarchand and the editors also wish to acknowledge and sincerely thank Liisa Malkki for granting us the right to reproduce the accounts of the Burundi genocide from her doctoral dissertation, Purity and Exile: Transformation in Historical-National Consciousness among Hutu Refugees in Tanzania. Finally, we greatly appreciate, too, all of the publishers and organizations that provided us with permission to use excerpts of various eyewitness accounts that previously appeared in their publications.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Century of Genocide: Critical Essays and Eyewitness Accounts
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 508

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.