Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century

By Stuart G. Shanker | Go to book overview

paradigm that emerged during the late 1980s, which portrays various forms of cognitive activity as informational exchanges within a network of interconnected nodes with varying weights and excitation levels. Description of these networks is often couched in terms of conditional probabilities, and hence could be recast without distortion in the technical terminology of communication theory. Connectionist researchers have already begun to study certain feedback characteristics of such systems, along with certain ways in which they might function in the control of motor behaviour ([9.19], 84). If attention were directed as well towards how these networks might adjust homeostatically in response to changes in a cognitively stimulating environment, connectionism might produce significant insight into the cybernetic workings of our cognitive faculties.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

General Introductions
9.1 Crosson, F.J. and Sayre, K.M. (eds) Philosophy and Cybernetics, Notre Dame University of Notre Dame Press, 1967.
9.2 Gunderson, K. 'Cybernetics', in P. Edwards (ed.) Encyclopedia of Philosophy, New York, Macmillan, 1967.
9.3 Sluckin, W. Minds and Machines, Baltimore, Penguin Books, 1954.
9.4 von Neumann, J. The Computer and the Brain, New Haven, Yale University Press, 1958.
9.5 Wiener, N. Cybernetics, or Control and Communication in the Animal and the Machine, Cambridge, MIT Press, 1948 (2nd edn 1961).
9.6--The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society, Garden City, Doubleday, 1954. (An earlier edition was published by Houghton Mifflin in 1950.)

Technical Introductions
9.7 Ashby, W.R. An Introduction to Cybernetics, London, Chapman and Hall, 1956.
9.8 George, F.H. The Foundations of Cybernetics, London, Gordon and Breach 1977.
9.9 Sayre, K.M. Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind, London, Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1976.

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • General Editors' Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Chronology xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 8
  • Chapter 1 - Philosophy of Logic 9
  • Bibliography 39
  • Chapter 2 - Philosophy of Mathematics in the Twentieth Century 50
  • Chapter 3 - Frege 124
  • Bibliography 153
  • Chapter 4 - Wittgenstein's Tractatus 157
  • Notes 187
  • Chapter 5 - Logical Positivism 193
  • Bibliography 210
  • Chapter 6 - The Philosophy of Physics 214
  • Bibliography 233
  • Chapter 7 - The Philosophy of Science Today 235
  • Chapter 8 - Chance, Cause and Conduct: Probability Theory and the Explanation of Human Action 266
  • Chapter 9 - Cybernetics 292
  • Bibliography 313
  • Chapter 10 - Descartes' Legacy: the Mechanist/Vitalist Debates 315
  • Notes 366
  • Glossary 376
  • Index 444
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 461

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.