NOTES

1LIFE AND TIMES
1
For Maximus' life, see principally Sherwood (1952), 1-22.
2
In the account of his trial in 655, Maximus states that he was then 75 years old: PG 90:128C.
3
Printed in the Migne edition of Maximus: PG 90.68-109.
4
Maximus himself confesses, in his prologue to the Mystagogia that he was privately educated and was not initiated into logoi technikoi (660B), which Berthold plausibly translates 'art of discourse' (Berthold [1985], 183). But this is a topos, so perhaps is not to be taken seriously. Maximus' style has, however, little of the graces of rhetoric, while being formidably learned at times.
5
Lackner (1967), 294f.
6
Lackner (1971). There is, as Lackner indicates, direct evidence from Maximus' own works that he had once been in the service of the 'Emperor here below' (Ep. 12:91.505B).
7
And finds support from Maximus' own words in Ep. 12 (505B).
8
In the account of his trial in 655, Maximus states that Anastasius had then been his disciple for thirty-seven years (PG 90:128C).
9
Brock (1973).
10
There is an echo of this tradition in the Syriac chronicle of Michael the Syrian and another anonymous Syriac chronicle, which note that Maximus was of Palestinian origin, from 'Iasphin': quoted in Guillaumont (1962), 179, and noted by Lackner (1967), 291.
11
I do not, however, think it at all plausible simply to take the evidence of the Syriac life for Maximus' childhood, and then add on the Greek evidence for the period from his time at the court of Heraclius, as Kazhdan seems to do (Kazhdan [1991], 2, 1323f., s.v. 'Maximos the Confessor'): it is simply incredible that a Palestinian monk could have become protoasecretis. Dalmais (1982) presents a more plausible case, arguing that Maximus' connections with the court were forged when he was a monk in Chrysopolis, an émigré from Palestine, then overrun by the Persians. But there still seems unimpeachable evidence that Maximus had been in the imperial service: see above, n. 6.

-199-

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Maximus the Confessor
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Life and Times 3
  • 2 - The Sources of Maximus' Theology 19
  • 3 - Maximus' Spiritual Theology 33
  • 4 - The Doctrine of the Person of Christ 48
  • 5 - Cosmic Theology 63
  • Texts 79
  • General Introduction to the Texts 81
  • Letter 2: on Love 84
  • Difficulty 10 94
  • Difficulty 41 155
  • Difficulty 71 163
  • Difficulty 1 169
  • Difficulty 5 171
  • Opuscule 7 180
  • Opuscule 3 192
  • Notes 199
  • Bibliography 220
  • Index 226
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