Developmentalism and Dependency in Southeast Asia: The Case of the Automotive Industry

By Jason P. Abbott | Go to book overview

4

Malaysia: managing foreign capital

Introduction

After Thailand, Malaysia was the most successful of the so-called second wave of NIEs. Between 1971 and 1990 growth rates averaged 6.7 per cent per year, a rate that accelerated to an average 8.8 per cent between 1989 and the 1997 Asian financial crisis (DTI, 1997). Practically written off by some observers in the mid-1980s (Robison et al., 1987), the Malaysian economy has been transformed with the share of manufacturing in GDP rising from 14 per cent in 1971 to 33 per cent by 2000 (Eighth Malaysia Plan, 2001). Diversifying away from raw material production and traditional manufactured exports to goods such as semiconductors, diskdrives, telecommunication apparatus, calculators, colour televisions, airconditioners and AV equipment, Malaysia was in 1997 the nineteenth leading exporter of world merchandise. Furthermore, Malaysia was ranked fourteenth in terms of international competitiveness and third among non-OECD countries after Singapore and Hong Kong (World Competitiveness Yearbook, 2001). Among the three economies examined in this book Malaysia perhaps more than Thailand or Indonesia, has sought to deliberately emulate the developmental experience of Japan and, among the NIEs, South Korea.

Like Japan, under the direction of Prime Minister Mahathir, Malaysia adopted a notion of Malaysia Incorporated, symbolising a commitment to a collaborative relationship between the public and private sector and between foreign and domestic capital towards long-term strategic goals (Hilley, 2000, p. 255). Like South Korea, Malaysia launched a heavy industrialisation import-substitution drive in order to deepen the country's economic structure particularly in automobile production, high technology exports and more recently aerospace.

As noted in Chapter 1, in order to assess whether or not the developmental experiences of Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand conform to a state-led development paradigm Deans' (2000) five-fold definition of the ideal characteristics of the CDS in East Asia will be used. Having considered the extent to which Malaysia conforms or deviates from this 'model',

-80-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Developmentalism and Dependency in Southeast Asia: The Case of the Automotive Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.