Natural Disasters and Development: In a Globalizing World

By Mark Pelling | Go to book overview

5

Natural disasters, adaptive capacity and development in the twenty-first century

Mohammed H.I. Dore and David Etkin

Introduction

There is widespread agreement that climate change poses a serious threat to the well-being of the earth's environment and the strength of its economies. The build-up of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide requires action be taken to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels in industrialized countries if the rate of climate change is to be reduced to a level which will allow the implementation of adaptations that will reduce negative impacts. These countries account for more than two-thirds of annual carbon dioxide emissions world-wide. Developing countries have much lower per capita emissions, and are more concerned with providing for the basic needs of their people, rather than climate change. Because it is projected that by the year 2020, the emissions from developing countries will exceed those of industrialized countries, the time is right to pursue a more sustainable path of development.

Natural disasters occur when an event such as an earthquake or storm reveals social vulnerability, and consequent damage to the physical and social fabric exceeds the ability of the affected community to recover without assistance. Societies respond to a disaster by means of three overlapping activities: response and recovery, mitigation and preparedness. These activities alter future vulnerability, reducing risk if they are done well or not if they are done badly. This relationship is shown in Figure 5.1 (Etkin 1999) and depicts a dynamic, interactive system, composed of both natural and social forces.

None of the boxes in this figure are static. It is the box in the top right corner, labelled 'Hazard', that is relevant to climate change. The frequency and intensity of heat waves, cold waves, droughts, floods, tornadoes, etc., are likely to change in the future, altering our risk. Of course, vulnerability changes over time as well, due to a host of socio-economic and environmental factors. While there are other factors that affect the vulnerability of a given society, in this chapter we concentrate on the impacts of climate change that are likely to be revealed largely through changes in the pattern, severity and frequency of climate-related natural disasters.

Working Group I of the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has concluded that the globally averaged surface

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Natural Disasters and Development: In a Globalizing World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 255

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.