Power, Postcolonialism, and International Relations: Reading Race, Gender, and Class

By Geeta Chowdhry; Sheila Nair | Go to book overview

6

“SEXING” GLOBALIZATION IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS:

Migrant sex and domestic workers in Cyprus, Greece, and Turkey

Anna M. Agathangelou

The national bourgeoisie organizes centers of rest and relaxation and pleasure resorts to meet the wishes of the Western bourgeoisie. Such activity is given the name of tourism, and for the occasion will be built up as a national industry … the little Brazilian and Mexican girls … the ports of Acapulco and Copacabana - all these are the stigma of this deprivation of the national middle class … [This class] will have nothing better to do than to take on the role of the manager of Western enterprise, and it will in practice set up its country as the brothel of Europe.

(Fanon 1965:153-4)

It's a processing center for prostitutes … Girls are brought here. They have no money and their passports are taken away. They become the property of the rings. Within a few years they are full-time prostitutes. They say they are “processed.” And then they are sold to other rings in Europe or the Middle East.

(Lazos quoted in Murphy 1998:2)

Sex work, prostitution, sex trade, sex trafficking, and domestic work are concepts that evoke both a sense of morality and criminalization in the global context. The global trade in women, a lucrative “shadow market, ” generates from 7 to 12 billion dollars annually (Hughes 2000). While these sexual relations suffuse international relations (IR) and constitute a lived experience, the field as an intellectual discipline continues to retain the (neo)realist fiction that IR is really only about competing states making rational choices independent of gender and sexual relations. Theoretical analysis of the sex trade remains underdeveloped in contemporary IR and international political economy (IPE), despite feminist critiques that have brought it to the forefront of policy and scholarly attention (Enloe 1990;

-142-

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Power, Postcolonialism, and International Relations: Reading Race, Gender, and Class
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Postcolonial Criticism 33
  • 3 - Situating Race in International Relations 56
  • 4 - Beyond Hegemonic State(Ment)S of Nature 82
  • 5 - Cultural Chauvinism and the Liberal International Order 115
  • 6 - “sexing” Globalization in International Relations: 142
  • 7 - In One Innings 170
  • 8 - The “new Cold War” 184
  • 9 - A Story to Be Told 209
  • 10 - Postcolonial Interrogations of Child Labor 225
  • 11 - Human Rights and Postcoloniality 254
  • Bibliography 285
  • Index 312
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