Power, Postcolonialism, and International Relations: Reading Race, Gender, and Class

By Geeta Chowdhry; Sheila Nair | Go to book overview

8

THE “NEW COLD WAR”

Secularism, orientalism, and postcoloniality

Shampa Biswas

It is clear that the multiple phenomena now increasingly categorized under the rubric of globalization have both universalizing and fragmenting tendencies. Emphasizing the simultaneity of the homogenizing and heterogenizing thrusts of globalization in the late twentieth-century world, Roland Robertson points to the twin processes embodied in “the particularization of universalism (the rendering of the world as a single place) and the universalization of particularism (the globalized expectation that societies … should have distinct identities)” (Beyer 1994:28). 1 It becomes possible through Robertson's analysis to see the universalization of the nation-state as an ideal cultural-political form of collective identity, one aspect of the homogenizing thrusts embodied in “the particularization of universalism, ” and in that sense very much a product of globalization. The now globalized expectation that nations exist and deserve their states provides the normative foundations for most contemporary international organizations as well as embodying the aspirations and political demands of many disenfranchised people around the world, despite the recent badgering the nation-state has taken from many quarters. It is then perhaps less curious that a vast literature in international relations has accepted so unproblematically this nation-state framework and has been so notoriously oblivious to the constant and ongoing production and reproduction of the nation-state as a unique historical entity. Yet one of the most striking outcomes of this lack of attention to processes of nation and state production has been the neglect of the other side of globalization - the heterogenizing thrusts that Robertson has described as the “universalization of particularism.” We live in a world, Robertson claims, in which not only has the “expectation of uniqueness” become institutionalized and globally widespread, but the local and the particular itself is produced on the basis of global norms (Robertson 1995:28). In other words, the globalization of international norms has produced not just the legitimacy of the idea of the nation-state, but also the expectation that such nation-states should embody unique and distinct identities. But it is only recently with critical constructivist, postmodern, and feminist writing in international relations that identity - and in particular the

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Power, Postcolonialism, and International Relations: Reading Race, Gender, and Class
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Postcolonial Criticism 33
  • 3 - Situating Race in International Relations 56
  • 4 - Beyond Hegemonic State(Ment)S of Nature 82
  • 5 - Cultural Chauvinism and the Liberal International Order 115
  • 6 - “sexing” Globalization in International Relations: 142
  • 7 - In One Innings 170
  • 8 - The “new Cold War” 184
  • 9 - A Story to Be Told 209
  • 10 - Postcolonial Interrogations of Child Labor 225
  • 11 - Human Rights and Postcoloniality 254
  • Bibliography 285
  • Index 312
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.