The Tutu Archaeological Village Site: A Case Study in Human Adaptation

By Elizabeth Righter | Go to book overview

Chapter Twelve


Post hole patterns: Structures, chronology and spatial distribution at the Tutu site

Elizabeth Righter


INTRODUCTION

The “curious neglect of architecture by academic anthropology” has been attributed to the fact that houses are taken for granted or treated as ethnographic “case” studies in symbolism or cosmology, rather than studied in their own right, or considered in relationship to the landscape on which they are situated (Carsten & Hugh-Jones, 1994:3, 4). A similar neglect may be observed in Caribbean archaeology which, until recently, has focused on excavation of midden deposits, ceramic typology and development of a cultural chronology for the Caribbean (Bartone & Versteeg, 1997). As noted by Siegel almost a decade ago, the study of architectural remains is one undeveloped archaeological domain which might help to balance archaeological research perspectives (Siegel, 1996:2).

In the past, some Caribbean archaeologists addressed the more obvious and impressive ceremonial structures, such as the ball and dance court complexes of Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic (Mason, 1941; Alegría, 1983; Oliver, 1998) but only recently have there been attempts to expose large contiguous expanses of prehistoric settlements for the purpose of documenting domestic structures and recording layouts of entire villages. Although few in number, these comprehensive investigations have inspired research into such related issues as estimated household population and village size (Curet, 1992 ; Siegel, 1992, 1996; Schinkel, 1992), cosmology, social organization and sociopolitical change reflected in settlement structure (Curet & Oliver, 1998 ; Hofman & Hoogland, 2000; Keegan & Maclachlan, 1989 ; Kingsley, 1985; Siegel, 1989, 1992, 1996; Schinkel, 1992). From these studies, it is increasingly demonstrated that households have an active role in social and cultural change (Curet, 1992; Curet & Oliver, 1998) and, in order to begin to understand these processes, much more information is needed about the diversity of house sizes and shapes, and their distribution on the land in relation to the physical and environmental setting of a site and the economy and social organization of its inhabitants.

Previously, there had been no real information about prehistoric village layout in the US Virgin Islands. For the Saladoid period, limited investigation of midden deposits and a few features, including human burials, at the Cane Bay and Judith's Fancy sites on St Croix (Payne & Thomas, 1988; Joseph, 1989), tentatively indicated an arrangement of structures in a horseshoe-shaped pattern around a central plaza. On other islands, investigations at the Maisabel, Punta Candelero and Monserrate sites in Puerto Rico, the Golden Rock site in St Eustatius, and Indian Creek in

-284-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Tutu Archaeological Village Site: A Case Study in Human Adaptation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 379

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.