Acknowledgements

The inspiration to write this book came from Professor R. Vaughan who, in his attempt to overcome the nationalist bias so clearly apparent in most Arctic history, encouraged several of his students to look across national borders and study the Arctic from a circumpolar point of view. It was Professor Vaughan who suggested the Soviet Arctic to me as a subject and introduced me to Dr T.E. Armstrong of the Scott Polar Research Institute. Dr Armstrong, whose expertise in the Soviet Arctic is well known, helped me to find my way in this field. His book on the Northern Sea Route greatly impressed and influenced me. His conversations with me were always enlightening as were his helpful comments on my book.

Of course, I also received many valuable remarks and suggestions from my supervisor, Professor B.N. Naarden, of the Oost Europa Instituut of the University of Amsterdam, and his colleagues Professor J.W. Bezemer, Professor H.J. Wagener of the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen and Dr Ph. Bosscher of the Marine Museum at Den Helder. Dr G.P.van den Berg, of the Documentatiebureau Oost-Europees Recht, Leiden, provided some much-needed criticism on legal matters.

Parts of the manuscript were read by Dr M. Broekmeyer, Dr H.de Lange, W.A. Timmermans and L. Reyntjes. I received valuable information from J. Braat, Custodian of the Willem Barents collection in the Rijksmuseum, and from W.F.Mörzer Bruyns of the Scheepvaartmuseum in Amsterdam.

Since most books for this study were obtained from foreign libraries, I owe much gratitude to the staff of the interlibrary loan department of the University of Groningen and their colleagues abroad, especially in the Lenin Library in Moscow. Also very helpful were B. Schellekens, librarian of the Oost-Europa Instituut, and F. Steneker of the Arctisch Centrum, Groningen.

For correcting my use of the English language, I am indebted to Ms A.C. Bardet, Mrs M. Vaughan and J.A.de Roos. T.de Vries, from the Computer Department of the Letteren Faculty of the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, aided me in sorting out various computer riddles.

Finally, I am grateful to my friends Marijke, Frans, Berent and Zweder for their interest and unfailing support.

-xii-

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The Soviet Arctic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Russian Policy in the Far North 1897-1917 6
  • 2 - Soviet Sovereignty in the Arctic and the Advent of Flying 1917-32 21
  • 3 - The Stalinization of Arctic Exploration 35
  • 4 - In Stalin's Time 1932-53 53
  • 5 - Arctic Policy During the Cold War 67
  • 6 - Historiography in the Cold War 84
  • 7 - The Age of the Nuclear Submarine 109
  • 8 - Arctic Shipping Since 1953 120
  • 9 - The Western Section: Winter Navigation 127
  • 10 - The Season of 1983 139
  • 11 - Arctic Studies Since 1953 152
  • Conclusion 170
  • Appendix 175
  • Glossary 179
  • Bibliography 181
  • Index 222
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