Towards a Global Polity

By Morten Ougaard; Richard Higgott | Go to book overview

4

Societal denationalization and positive governance

Michael Zürn


Introduction

The study of the effects of globalization, or societal denationalization, on the national capacity to govern on the one hand and the study of international institutions on the other, are peculiarly separated. It would seem, however, more logical to combine these efforts for a more thorough understanding of governance, and thus to build another bridge across the 'great divide' (Caporaso 1997) between national order and international anarchy. Do international regimes arise especially in those issue areas in which national intervention has become counter-productive? To what extent is international governance a response to the decline in the effectiveness of national policies? Do international regimes systematically favour certain policy types and governance goals over others?

Rationalist theories of both international institutions and the democratic welfare state offer a number of objections to the notion that governance beyond the nation-state can overcome the current deficits of national governance. These objections state that the effectiveness of international institutions, when measured against more general governance goals, is highly conditional on structural prerequisites that are very unlikely to be met outside of the national context. First, both neo-realist theorists of international politics and a good many theorists of continental jurisprudence hold the view that the right of governance is structurally or constitutionally reserved for a central power, and they draw a categorical line between the national and the international sphere. Governance, in this view, is bound to the existence of a superior power, which most of the time is lacking at the level beyond the nation-state. According to another set of objections, it is pointed out that international institutions can only enforce certain types of regulation. Although, it is argued, international institutions do play a role, it is restricted to the creation of markets and facilitation of free cross-border exchanges. Measures that intervene into such exchanges are only possible within a hierarchical national structure. The structural problem here with governance beyond the nation-state is thus that for the purposes of social welfare, economic efficiency is priori-

-78-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Towards a Global Polity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.