Dignity and Daily Bread: New Forms of Economic Organising among Poor Women in the Third World and the First

By Sheila Rowbotham; Swasti Mitter | Go to book overview

Chapter 8

Homework in West Yorkshire

Jane Tate


ABSTRACT

During the 1970s in Britain, feminist, community and research groups were becoming aware of homework as a low-paid and often dangerous form of women 's work. The 1980s saw thef ormation of organisations which have used several methods to publicise and organise homeworkers.

By the late 1980s these had started networking internationally, not only in Europe where the Common Market makes homework a policy matter but also in the Third World. SEWA's approach (see Chapter 5) has been an important influence upon them. Information is now being gathered through international organisatlons like the ILO which help to make visible this hidden form of labour.

Homework, however, takes many forms as Jane Tate shows in this study of one region, West Yorkshire. Her account assesses the varying strategies used by the West Yorkshire Homeworking Group and also outlines current international debates on homework policies.


THE BACKGROUND

The West Yorkshire Homeworking Group is part of a network of groups around the country which has grown up since homework was revived as an issue in the 1970s. Their concern is not only to document homework but also to bring about change, in particular legal measures to protect homeworkers. A comparison with the agitation early in the twentieth century shows both continuity and change. The most important parallel is the part played by the women's movement and feminist ideas in general, in terms of both research and organising. The two periods have seen an alliance of forces, with women's organisations co-operating with trade unions, researchers, sections of the church and others. But there are also important differences arising from the specific historical context. First, there has been a change of emphasis in the groups working on homeworking, from acting on behalf of homeworkers to working with them. Second, the position of black and Asian women in Britain today, and their role in the homework campaigns, are of crucial importance. The third main difference is the international outlook of the

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dignity and Daily Bread: New Forms of Economic Organising among Poor Women in the Third World and the First
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.