Real and Imagined Women: Gender, Culture, and Postcolonialism

By Rajeswari Sunder Rajan | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I have had the support, friendship and critical advice of many friends and colleagues whom I take this opportunity to name and thank: Rimli Bhattacharya, Vivek Dhareshwar, Margaret Higonnet, Sharada Jain, Ania Loomba, Tejaswini Niranjana, Judith Plotz, Arvind Rajagopal, Venkat Rao, Amrit Srinivasan, and Kamala Visweswaran.

Dr G.K. Das, Director of the South Campus of the University of Delhi, graciously gave me permission to use the library at the South Campus.

To those who helped me cope with the mysteries of the computer-R. Chandramouli, R. Parthasarathy, V. Krishnamoorthy and A.K. Ghosh-my heartfelt thanks.

My editors at Routledge have been unfailingly helpful.

My parents, my brothers, my sisters-in-law and my niece were everything that only a family can be during a time of crisis; this acknowledgement of my gratitude is only a meagre return for all that they have given me. My son Kaushik typed, criticized and relieved the tedium of my work: he has been an invaluable ally.

I could not have written this book without my husband's support, encouragement and love. It is therefore jointly dedicated to him and our son.

-x-

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Real and Imagined Women: Gender, Culture, and Postcolonialism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures ix
  • Acknowledgements x
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Subject of Sati 15
  • 2 - Representing Sati 40
  • 3 - Life After Rape 64
  • 4 - The Name of the Husband 83
  • 5 - Gender, Leadership and Representation 103
  • 6 - Real and Imagined Women 129
  • Index 147
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