Industrial Subsidies and Friction in World Trade: Trade Policy or Trade Politics?

By Rambod Behboodi | Go to book overview

6

THE URUGUAY ROUND

INTRODUCTION

Coming to an agreement on a 'new and improved' Subsidies Code has not been an easy task; it has taken nearly eight years for the 117 members of the GATT to reach a final agreement on some of the most contentious trade issues of our time. Throughout the tumultuous process, the breakdowns, and the walkouts, part of the difficulty was the divergent expectations and objectives with which the participants entered into the negotiations. Aside from issues such as agricultural subsidies and the civil aircraft problem that threatened to derail the entire process, the key participants in the negotiations over the subsidies code could not agree on why a subsidies code was even needed.

The US ostensibly sought strict controls on subsidies, although its commitment to a subsidies code was less than apparent. Canada and the EU's primary objective was to contain the US use of CVDs, 1 while neither was willing to admit that the US use of countervailing duties is, in essence, no different from their own use of subsidies. The US and Canada pursued a more judicial approach to subsidies regulation, while the EU argued that 'the dispute settlement procedure cannot be used to create new obligations or to replace the process of negotiation', 2 even though the highly judicialised internal dispute resolution mechanism of the EU has, in many ways, fostered negotiation rather than stifled it.

The Agreement 3 attempts to bridge these widely divergent, and even contradictory, approaches. It does so first by adopting what the literature has termed the 'traffic light' approach to subsidies. Second, it remains faithful to the principle of multilateralism enshrined in the GATT and the Subsidies Code. Third, while retaining the

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Industrial Subsidies and Friction in World Trade: Trade Policy or Trade Politics?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • List of Abbreviations and Specialised Terms xi
  • Part I - The Background 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Domestic Industrial Subsidies in International Trade Theory 7
  • Part II - International Institutions for the Regulation of Subsidies 45
  • Introduction 47
  • 3 - Multilateral Regulation of Subsidies 50
  • 4 - Supranational Regulation of Subsidies 81
  • 5 - Unilateral Regulation of Subsidies 97
  • Part III - The Outlook 131
  • 6 - The Uruguay Round 133
  • 7 - Conclusion 151
  • Notes 157
  • Bibliography 193
  • Index 208
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.