History, ICT, and Learning in the Secondary School

By Terry Haydn; Christine Counsell | Go to book overview

9

Getting started in history and ICT

Alf Wilkinson


Introduction

This chapter is aimed at history departments, history teachers and history teacher-trainees who do not feel confident about their proficiency and knowledge of ICT, or about integrating ICT with schemes of work, and making computers part of the day-to-day work of teachers and pupils.

Where 'baseline' experience of using ICT in the teaching and learning of history is limited, the way forward is as much about attitudes to change and teachers' learning as about technological proficiency in ICT. It is also about departmental collaboration and development, and perhaps as Chapter 3 indicates, it involves, above all, clarity of thinking about planning for learning in history generally, as well as understanding how ICT impacts on the pedagogy of school history.

As Chapters 1 and 2 indicate, if not heavily into using computers to enhance the teaching and learning of history, your's is not the only department in that position. My own experience of working with history departments over the past several years bears out recent research which suggests that there are obstacles and difficulties to realising the potential of ICT in history (Bardwell and Easdown 1999). As Terry Haydn argues in Chapter 1, computers are not unproblematical educational miracles. It needs time, thought and energy to turn ICT resources into worthwhile learning means in history, but it can be enjoyable, interesting and fulfilling working out how to achieve this, and it can be a good test of how well departments are able to work together at the important challenge of managing change. Getting started in history and ICT is partly about moving towards a position where thinking about how new technology might contribute to history lessons is seen as an interesting and relevant challenge, rather than a threat and a burden.

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History, ICT, and Learning in the Secondary School
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Tables ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Computers and History 11
  • 2 - The Use of ICT for Teaching History: Slow Growth, Some Green Shoots 38
  • 3 - The Forgotten Games Kit 52
  • 4 - Building Learning Packages 109
  • 5 - Relating the General to the Particular 134
  • 6 - ICT + Maps 152
  • 7 - Using ICT to Develop Historical Understanding and Skills 176
  • 8 - What Do They Do with the Information? 192
  • 9 - Getting Started in History and ICT 225
  • 10 - History, ICT and Learning 2002-10 249
  • Index 261
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