Southeast Asia: A Testament

By George Mct. Kahin | Go to book overview

Foreword

A scholar's highest obligation, the phrase had it in the 1960s, was to speak truth to power. It turned out, however, that truth was a tragically relative term in the Cold War era. Many Americans were sent abroad to die by the tens-of-thousands, while Asians, Latin Americans, and Africans were sentenced to death by the millions, because US officials disagreed with foreign leaders about what each believed was true in terms of the needs of their own national interests.

George Kahin circumvented this problem by raising the intellectual obligation one level higher. He believed it was most important to speak knowledge to power. This obligation required work, not revelation - least of all a revelation shaped by a 1945-to-1950 world that did little to explain the rising nationalisms that tore the two superpowers' policies apart in the post-1950 era. George, to understate, did not trust preaching and revelation.

Because of his pursuit of the facts on the ground, a pursuit so disciplined that even two heart attacks after age 38 could not limit it, he became a towering figure, especially during the era of America's longest war. As Jayne S. Werner has noted, “Virtually all the arguments he made at the time have since been accepted by both academics and journalists, including many who once supported or quasi-supported the US position. Even former government figures have acknowledged the foresight he had at the time.” 1

This testament tells of George's life-long search for both the facts on the ground and the complex historical background that shaped what he studied. It also reveals the immense personal risks he took and the traumas he suffered, including continuing nightmares after visiting Vietnamese hospitals during the war. It contains a highly detailed, compelling, first-person account of the 1948-9 Indonesian revolution against Dutch colonialism. As he understood at the time, and elaborated in his landmark 1952 study, Nationalism and Revolution in Indonesia, the upheaval marked a crucial turn in the great historical process of anti-colonialism that shaped the next half-century. This view of Asian anti-colonialism, sharpened by the Dutch who arrested him because of his work, intensified George's determination to create the systematic study of nationalisms for the foreign policies of a nation that acted as a superpower while also acting, as it turned out, in considerable

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Southeast Asia: A Testament
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xxiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Indonesian Revolution 17
  • 2 - Communism and the Republic 54
  • 3 - The Dutch Attack on Yogyakarta 86
  • 4 - The Dutch Transfer Sovereignty 116
  • 5 - Mccarthy, Lattimore and Cochran 126
  • 6 - Return to Indonesia 140
  • 7 - Struggle Over Malaysia 158
  • 8 - Cornell and the Coup 177
  • 9 - Opposition to the Vietnam War 182
  • 10 - Casualties and Pacification, 1966/7 195
  • 11 - Possibilities for Peace, 1971 214
  • 12 - North Vietnam, 1972 223
  • 13 - Cambodian Neutrality and the United States 249
  • 14 - Cambodia and the Vietnam War 269
  • 15 - Coup Against Sihanouk 279
  • 16 - Invasion of Cambodia 300
  • Notes 314
  • Index 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.