Marxist History and Postwar Japanese Nationalism

By Curtis Anderson Gayle | Go to book overview

Notes

1National imagery and international Marxism
1
Tôyama Shigeki, Sengo no Rekishigaku to Rekishi Ishiki, Tokyo: Iwanami Shoten, 1968, pp. 90-6.
2
See Masao Maruyama, “Nationalism in Japan: Its Theoretical Background and Prospects, ” in Masao Maruyama, Thought and Behavior in Modern Japanese Politics, London: Oxford University Press, 1963, pp. 135-56.
3
For a general overview of the development of the Society itself, see Rekishigaku Kenkyûkai (ed.), Sengo Rekishigaku to Rekishi no Ayumi, Tokyo: Aoki Shoten, 1993. Hereafter, I refer to the group using the English translation offered by its members during the early postwar, viz., the “Historical Science Society.”
4
Ishimoda Shô, Rekishi to Minzoku no Hakken, Tokyo: Tokyo Daigaku Shuppankai, 1953.
5
Joseph Stalin, “The Nation, ” John Hutchinson and Anthony Smith (eds), Nationalism, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 1994, p. 20 (originally published in 1913).
6
Joseph Stalin, Marxism and the National and Colonial Question, Moscow: Foreign Languages Publishing House, 1940, p. 82.
7
That is, the history of a subjugated class or social group. Although used in much postcolonial theory, the term originally goes back to Antonio Gramsci. See Antonio Gramsci, Selections from the prison notebooks of Antonio Gramsci, edited by Quintin Hoare and Geoffrey Nowell-Smith, New York: International Publisher, 1999.
8
This kind of metaphysical essentialism of the prewar has also been framed in terms of a “cultural organicism” rooted in “national aesthetics.” See Leslie Pincus, Authenticating Culture in Imperial Japan: Kuki Shuzô and the Rise of National Aesthetics, Berkeley and London: University of California Press, 1996.
9
Ephraim Nimni, Marxism and Nationalism: Theoretical Origins of a Political Crisis, London and Boulder: Pluto Press, 1991, p. 194.
10
Gayatri Spivak, “Criticism, Feminism and the Institution; Interview with Elizabeth Gross, ” Thesis Eleven 10/11 (November/March, 1984-5) pp. 175-87.
11
Ien Ang, “The Differential Politics of Chineseness, ” Southeast Asian Journal of Social Science, vol. 22 (1994) pp. 73-5.
12
Harry Harootunian, History's Disquiet: Modernity, Cultural Practice, and the Question of Everyday Life, New York: Columbia University Press, 2000, p. 50.
13
See for example his “Ethnic Nationalism and Romanticism in Early Twentieth-Century Japan, ” Journal of Japanese Studies, vol. 22, no. 1 (1996) pp. 77-103. In applying this idea of “anti-state nationalism” to twentieth-century Japan, Doak cites John Breuilly's Nationalism and the State, Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1982, for precedents from modern nationalism theory.
14
Stefan Berger, Mark Donovan and Kevin Passmore, Writing National Histories: Western Europe Since 1800, London and New York: Routledge, 1999. See Preface.

-166-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marxist History and Postwar Japanese Nationalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.