Do Political Campaigns Matter? Campaign Effects in Elections and Referendums

By David M. Farrell; Rudiger Schmitt-Beck | Go to book overview

Preface and acknowledgements

There are occasions when it is evident that a theme is ripe for more scholarly attention. Perhaps the echo of our call for papers for a workshop on the political consequences of modern electioneering, held in Copenhagen in 2000 under the auspices of the European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR), is just such an indication. This stimulated more than forty proposals-twice as many as we could accommodate in the workshop. In their turn, the number of papers presented at the workshop were twice as many as we could eventually include in this volume, given the space limitations and the need to provide a reasonable balance of coverage in terms of themes and countries. Difficult choices had to be made about which papers to include, but we want to stress at the outset that this volume has resulted from a group effort, and therefore we should record our thanks to those workshop participants not included in this volume whose presentations and comments helped to stimulate so much of what is included. These were: Kees Aarts, Wolfram Brunner, Rachel Gibson, Christina Holtz-Bacha, Hanne Marthe Narud, Henar Criado Olmos, Geoffrey K. Roberts, Patrick Seyd, Henry Valen, Philip van Praag, Paul Whiteley and Michael Wolf.

We also wish to express our thanks to the chapter authors who put up with our requests (sometimes several) for revisions and redrafting. That this volume was completed on time is testimony to their speed, efficiency and good humour throughout. We are grateful to the series editor, Jan van Deth, to our referees and also to Shaun Bowler and Barbara Pfetsch for their helpful and constructive comments, and to our Routledge editors, Craig Fowlie, Heidi Bagtazo and Belinda Dearbergh, for their guidance and support throughout. Thanks also to Oxford University Press for allowing us to reprint Table 1.1, originally published in R. Dalton and M.P. Wattenberg, Parties without Partisans, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000.

Tanja Pagel (ZUMA) was invaluable in helping us to prepare the manuscript for publication and we wish to record our particular gratitude to her for this. Thanks are also due to the Centre for Survey Research and Methodology (ZUMA) at Mannheim, which hosted David Farrell for a visit in summer 2001, enabling us to take big steps towards completing the final editing during a week of intense work.

-xix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Do Political Campaigns Matter? Campaign Effects in Elections and Referendums
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.