Language Processing in Discourse: A Key to Felicitous Translation

By Monika Doherty | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

The main part of this book was written during my 'sabbatical' in the winter of 1998/9. It is the result of several years of research work with colleagues and students on questions of position and explicitness in translations between German and English. Most examples in the book were taken from selected chapters in a popular scientific German book. The original and its translation form part of an electronic corpus of German/English texts gathered during three successive research projects (on parametrized perspectives, adverbial clauses and cleft sentences). I would like to thank Gideon Toury and Peter Eisenberg for their critical and encouraging comments on the manuscript; Phyllis Anderson for her painstaking work with the corpus and the bibliography, tracing the discussions of past and current research sessions; Michael Davies for his prompt and subtle control of the English wording of the book, including the ranking of the control paraphrases of the English translations; Sigrid Venuß and Thomas Schulz for their precise and patient assistance with the orthography and layout of the various components of the book; Birgit Ahlemeyer, John Bergeron, Inga Kohlhof and all my students for their stimulating arguments on a great variety of aspects directly or indirectly related to the topic of the book.

-xiii-

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Language Processing in Discourse: A Key to Felicitous Translation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Abbreviations xiv
  • 1 - Setting the Scene 1
  • 2 - Questions of Order 21
  • 3 - Complex Sentences 39
  • 4 - In Favour of Primary Relations 58
  • 5 - Structural Weight 81
  • 6 - Grammaticalized Clues 103
  • 7 - Shifting Boundaries 121
  • 8 - Relativizing Optimality 137
  • 9 - Reviewing the Scene 160
  • Glossary 165
  • Notes 180
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 189
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