The Politics of Human Rights in Southeast Asia

By Philip J. Eldridge | Go to book overview

5

Indonesia

Democratic transition and human rights

President Suharto's resignation on 21 May 1998, under conditions of widespread disorder, launched Indonesia into uncharted political waters. Despite initiating major political reforms, his immediate successor, President Habibie, lacked adequate legitimacy to survive. Abdurrachman Wahid became Indonesia's first democratically elected President in October 1999. Despite achieving important democratic changes, his presidency has operated under severe strains from the outset (ICG 2001c) and currently appears unsustainable. Wahid's commitment to religious and cultural pluralism and tolerance has not spared Indonesia from extensive inter-ethnic and religious violence, social and political disorder.

Underlying causes of continuing crisis reach beyond personalities to fundamental problems of democratic transition. While Thailand and the Philippines are undergoing similar transitions, Indonesia historically lacks both the continuity of Thailand's core institutions and the Philippines' democratic legal and constitutional infrastructure. Contemporary struggles display both continuity and discontinuity, rooted in Indonesia's unique history, political and cultural configurations. Human rights issues must be understood within a similar frame of reference.

The first part of the chapter identifies relevant ideological and institutional inheritances from Suharto's 'New Order', featuring both government and civil society, including NGO, labour and Islamic discourses surrounding human rights and democracy issues. These reflect conflict between communitarian and liberal-democratic outlooks familiar from earlier chapters. The account traces the beginnings of change under Suharto into the post-1998 period, including constitutional reform, military-civilian relations, the economic crisis and regional devolution, particularly the strained situation in Aceh and Irian Jaya. The final section reviews current trends in human rights policy, particularly the role of Indonesia's National Human Rights Commission (Komnas HAM) and politics surrounding recent human rights legislation.


History and institutions

Indonesia declared independence on 17 August 1945, although Holland did not finally surrender sovereignty until November 1949. Conflicts fought out during these four years (Kahin 1952; Reid 1974) vitally influenced subsequent political

-116-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Human Rights in Southeast Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgements viii
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - International Human Rights 12
  • 2 - Human Rights, Democracy and Development in Southeast Asia 32
  • 3 - Asean and International Human Rights 60
  • 4 - Malaysia 90
  • 5 - Indonesia 116
  • 6 - East Timor, Indonesia and the United Nations 151
  • 7 - Australia, Southeast Asia and Human Rights 160
  • Conclusion 196
  • Glossary of Indonesian and Malay Terms 201
  • Notes 202
  • Bibliography 208
  • Index 222
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.