Scientific Management

By Frederick Winslow Taylor; Kenneth Thompson | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT, in his address to the Governors at the White House, prophetically remarked that "The conservation of our national resources is only preliminary to the larger question of national efficiency."

The whole country at once recognized the importance of conserving our material resources and a large movement has been started which will be effective in accomplishing this object. As yet, however, we have but vaguely appreciated the importance of "the larger question of increasing our national efficiency."

We can see our forests vanishing, our water-powers going to waste, our soil being carried by floods into the sea; and the end of our coal and our iron is in sight. But our larger wastes of human effort, which go on every day through such of our acts as are blundering, ill-directed, or inefficient, and which Mr. Roosevelt refers to as a lack of "national efficiency, " are less visible, less tangible, and are but vaguely appreciated.

We can see and feel the waste of material things. Awkward, inefficient, or ill-directed movements of men, however, leave nothing visible or tangible behind them. Their appreciation calls for an act

-231-

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Scientific Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction to the Early Sociology of Management and Organizations v
  • Foreword 5
  • Foreword 21
  • Preface 29
  • Shop Management 31
  • Shop Management 33
  • Index 221
  • The Principles of Scientific Management 227
  • Introduction 231
  • Chapter I - Fundamentals of Scientific Managemen 235
  • Chapter II 256
  • Taylor S Testimony Before the Special House Committee 371
  • Taylor's Testimony Before the Special House Committee 375
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