ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I must begin by expressing my indebtedness to a number of scholars whose intensive studies in their specialized fields have made this book possible. In the first chapter I rely on Francis P. MacGinty's careful translation and scholarly annotation of the Latin texts of the Irish Augustine, while in the second chapter I am indebted to the Sheldon-Williams and O'Meara translations of John Scottus Eriugena. I am grateful to Liam Chambers for drawing my attention to, and permitting me to read his work in progress on, Michael Moore. In the case of the chapters on eighteenth-century thinkers I owe a particular debt to the original historical and interpretive work of David Berman. For the chapters on the nineteenth century, I am indebted to the researches and counsels of faculty colleague, Tadhg Foley, who is a connoisseur of little-known or forgotten nineteenth-century Irish thinkers. Some of the less celebrated figures from this period owe their inclusion to Dr Foley's unflagging advocacy.

I am indebted also to those who read and corrected early drafts of the various chapters, and to those who answered queries, or provided me with solicited and unsolicited materials, or simply gave encouragement along the way. These put-upon readers, patient responders, long-suffering encouragers, and magnanimous providers of materials include Tom Boylan, Dan Carey, Liam Chambers, Dolores Dooley, Steve Ellis, John Foley, Adrian Frasier, Luke Gibbons, Colm Luibhéid, Niall Ó Cíosáin, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Paschal O'Gorman, Rosaleen O'Neill, Bill Starr, and Markus Wörner. Thanks of a more formal and more

-xvii-

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A History of Irish Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • 1 - Interpreting Marvels 1
  • 2 - The Philosophy of Creation 18
  • 3 - Nature Observed 45
  • 4 - John Toland and the Ascendancy of Reason 82
  • 5 - Wonderfully Mending the World 124
  • 6 - Against the Selfish Philosophers 168
  • 7 - Peripheral Visions (1) 214
  • 8 - Peripheral Visions (2) 241
  • 9 - Between Extremities 285
  • Bibliography 321
  • Index 348
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