Advertising and Consumer Citizenship: Gender, Images, and Rights

By Anne M. Cronin | Go to book overview

5

Female visions

Advertising, women and narrative

The previous chapter challenged the idea that the viewers straightforwardly 'express' their agency in interpreting advertising images. Some views posit that the subject uses the advertisement's meanings as raw materials - or signposts directing their material acts of consuming goods - to construct 'messages' which are designed to communicate ideas about their identity to others. I argued instead that the subject is produced performatively in acts of vision. This disrupts a conventional notion of agency residing in the subject, awaiting expression through the interpretation and appropriation of signifiers in advertising. I examined the implications of the contemporary fluidity and dereferentiality of signifiers - their detachment from their original signifieds opens the field of signification to rearticulation. For Virilio (1994), this dereferentiality manifests itself in an untethering of the image from a material 'support surface' (print or celluloid). Instead, it engages a self-consciously temporal connection to the viewer in order to generate meaning. These moments of contact and interpretation, I argued, are branded by advertising in an attempt to articulate consumerist identities through specific commercial products. Framed by advertising, these interpretative manoeuvres reconsolidate the status and rights of the (white, male, heterosexual, middle-class) 'individual'. Simultaneously, they reiterate the uneasy positionings of 'others' between and across the borders of discourses of presence, visibility and 'individuality'. In effect, these positionings marginalise such groups in conceptual 'elsewhere(s)' and 'elsewhen(s)' and operate to 're-centre' the exclusive category of 'the individual'. Yet the theoretical approaches used to examine the shifting discourses of 'the individual' cannot be directly mapped onto an exploration of the elsewhere(s)/ elsewhen(s). This requires an approach to temporality and the 'betweenness' of moments which attends to the disjunctures in these spaces/times. In this chapter I examine the forms of self-temporality available to female viewers of advertisements in magazines. Through an analysis of narratives of self, distance, contact, tactility and performance, I explore the textual address in advertising targeted at women and consider what forms of marginalised agency may be available to them. I examine this in the context of advertising in women's magazines and draw on studies of gender and popular culture

-105-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advertising and Consumer Citizenship: Gender, Images, and Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Plates vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Individual, the Citizen and the Consumer 10
  • 2 - Advertising Knowledges 37
  • 3 - Advertising, Texts and Textual Strategies 54
  • 4 - Branding Vision 83
  • 5 - Female Visions 105
  • 6 - Visual Epistemologies and New Consumer Rights 133
  • Concluding Remarks 156
  • Notes 163
  • Bibliography 167
  • Index 175
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 179

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.