Writing Cures: An Introductory Handbook of Writing in Counselling and Psychotherapy

By Gillie Bolton; Stephanie Howlett et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

'When I write, I think': personal uses of writing by international students

Colin Lago

He stopped the diary out of fear for his eyesight, and said that abandoning it was a form of death.

(Tomalin 2002:xxxvii, 279)

I always have to write something every day. A day when I write nothing is a desert.

(Fowles 1998:6)


Introduction

The phrase, 'When I write, I think' was proffered by a Chinese student, quite spontaneously, in a counselling interview several years ago. (Extraordinarily, the same phrase was expressed by another international student from quite another part of the world, in the survey described in this chapter.)

The two quotations used above (the first refers to Samuel Pepys, the seventeenth-century diarist) further underpin the very considerable existential value of writing for the writers themselves.

This chapter constitutes an attempt to synthesise the accounts offered by some international students at a British university on their 'personal' writing activities. In the UK, the majority of international students are between the ages of 18 and 30. They are a group (comprising approximately 100,000 students currently studying in the UK) who have ended up, for the purpose of pursuing higher education, living in a country other than their own for an extended period of time. This chapter therefore focuses upon their experiences of (and with) writing during their cross-cultural sojourn.

The following brief study highlights yet again the therapeutic and educational potential of 'personal writing' and also indicates the extent to which such writing might assist the writer in combating the many challenges to personal identity that are an inevitable and sometimes painful consequence of moving cultures.

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Writing Cures: An Introductory Handbook of Writing in Counselling and Psychotherapy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 238

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.