Child Pornography: An Internet Crime

By Max Taylor; Ethel Quayle | Go to book overview

Chapter 8

A model of problematic Internet use

Previous chapters in this book have explored the range of activities related to child pornography and the Internet. Although the issues raised are matters of considerable public concern, we have noted many times that there is little by way of consistent analysis in the area, and a marked absence of conceptual thinking from which more empirically based approaches to management of the problem can draw. As an attempt to address this gap, in the following we present a model of adult sexual interest in children and problematic Internet use. Such a model might serve several functions. It enables us to think of sexual offences against children that arise out of Internet use as being part of a complex array of behaviours, rather than any single activity. Such behaviours occur in relationship to each other, although, because of the process of offending, not all people who use the Internet will engage in offence-related behaviour to the same degree. For example, the person who downloads child pornography as part of an array of pornographies, but who does not communicate with others, trade or produce material, may be qualitatively different from the person who uses children within their social world to produce images to trade on the Internet. The latter has necessarily committed a contact offence against a child in the production of material, but has also had prior engagement with the Internet pornography world that necessitated the production of pictures. It is also evident that while there are people who have previously acknowledged a sexual interest in children, for whom the Internet becomes a medium for meeting their expressed preferences, there are equally those who seem to have had no prior knowledge that the images might be sexually arousing for them. In the latter case, we do not know whether such 'dormant' interests might ever have found expression without the Internet. This model also allows us to look at the cognitions or 'self-statements' that people generate in relation to their activities, that enable them to behave in ways that bring them into conflict with the law.

In developing the model, three issues seem important. The first is to note that adult sexual interest in children on the Internet embraces both illegal and legal activities. Collecting child pornography is illegal, but talking about fantasy or engaging in sexual role-plays while they may be inappropriate are not necessarily illegal. Sharing information about computer security is not illegal, but sharing

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Child Pornography: An Internet Crime
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Nature of Child Pornography 21
  • Chapter 3 - Adult Sexual Interest in Children 47
  • Chapter 4 - The Internet, Child Pornography and Adult Sexual Interest in Children 74
  • Chapter 5 - Metamorphosis 97
  • Chapter 6 - A Virtual Community 120
  • Chapter 7 - The Process of Collecting 148
  • Chapter 8 - A Model of Problematic Internet Use 171
  • Chapter 9 - Issues for Concern and Conclusions 191
  • References 214
  • Index 226
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.