Sexual Murder: Catathymic and Compulsive Homicides

By Louis B. Schlesinger | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to express my appreciation to all colleagues, friends, and students who have supported my work either directly in discussions of the material or indirectly by their encouragement and patience. Special thanks go to Becky McEldowney, acquisition editor at CRC Press, who was very helpful and encouraging throughout the entire project. I am indebted to Ellen Sexton and Maria Kiriakova, John Jay College's librarians extraordinaire, who-at a moment's notice-are able to obtain any article or book ever published, and even some that were not. Maria was especially helpful in translating Hans Maiers' papers from the original German. I also want particularly to thank Navis Edwards, my longtime friend and assistant, who did her usual excellent job in typing, as well as deciphering my dictation. Finally, I want to express my gratitude to my wife Beth and son Gene who are always willing to put aside many of their own pursuits to listen to my endless tales of sexual murder cases-even during dinner!

-ix-

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