Changing Direction: British Military Planning for Post-War Strategic Defence, 1942-1947

By Julian Lewis | Go to book overview

6

THE JOINT PLANNING STAFF AND AN APPROVED DEFENCE STRATEGY 1945-47

1.

The Directors of Plans Take Over

Had it not been for the need to have the Tizard report revised almost as soon as it was completed, the Joint Planning Staff would have been quite well placed to carry long-term strategic planning forward swiftly on supplanting the Post-Hostilities Planners in July 1945. It was not as. if the Directors of Plans were unfamiliar with the type of work involved. They had often been consulted by the P.H.P.S., and the Chiefs of Staff had occasionally turned to them for advice when more immediate post-war topics arose rather than to Allen, Curtis and Warburton. It was they, for example, who had been handling the question of Service man-power requirements in 'Stage II'-the expected lengthy period between the defeat of Germany and that of Japan. More significantly, perhaps, they had been called upon to produce assessments of future British and Soviet strategic interests in the Far East and of the military aspects of post-war Anglo-Spanish relations; 1 and they had even been responsible for preparing a paper on British prospects in a Continental war with the Soviet Union, though the writing of this report was never officially recorded. 2

It was on 24 May, just over a fortnight after the German surrender, that the C.I.G.S. noted in his diary that his evening had been spent going 'carefully through the Planners' report on the possibility of taking on Russia should trouble arise in our future discussions with her'. He went on:

1. See Chapter 4, Section 5, pp. 143-4 & 154 above

2. Having examined all the 1945 C.O.S. and J.P.S. material held by his department, the Departmental Record Officer of the Cabinet Office has confirmed there to be no trace of any such paper. Alanbrooke's subsequent remarks about its reception give support to his view that 'this might have been one of those occasions when certain matters were raised at a meeting but not recorded, and papers looked at, possibly in draft, and have gone no further'. (J. Robertson to the author, 3 December 1980)

-242-

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Changing Direction: British Military Planning for Post-War Strategic Defence, 1942-1947
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Note on Formerly Withheld Documents ix
  • List of Plates x
  • Foreword xiii
  • Acknowledgements xvii
  • Abbreviations xviii
  • Preface to the First Edition xxi
  • Introduction to the Second Edition xxv
  • 1 - The Foreign Office Origins of Post-War Strategic Planning 1942 1
  • 2 - The Military Sub-Committee 1942-43 17
  • 3 - The Post-Hostilities Planning Sub-Committee 1943-44 55
  • 4 - The Post-Hostilities Planning Staff 1944-45 98
  • 5 - The Joint Technical Warfare Committee and the Future Nature of Warfare 1945-46 178
  • 6 - The Joint Planning Staff and an Approved Defence Strategy 1945-47 242
  • Appendix 1 340
  • Appendix 2 345
  • Appendix 3 349
  • Appendix 4 354
  • Appendix 5 357
  • Appendix 6 359
  • Appendix 7 370
  • Appendix 8 388
  • References 411
  • Index 443
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