The Dimensions of Global Citizenship: Political Identity beyond the Nation-State

By Darren J.O'Byrne | Go to book overview

4

Modernity, Globality and Globalization

We live in an age of pragmatism, wherein our relationship with the world is unmediated by the nation-state. Post-war events have served to heighten our sense of 'globality'; that is, our appreciation of,andrelationship with, the world as a single place.


THE CHALLENGE OF GLOBALIZATION

If the dominant model of citizenship has been the nation-state model, then clearly its greatest challenge arises from the widely discussed 'crisis of the nation-state'. For some, this crisis relates to a wider process (or processes) which has (have) been termed 'globalization'. However, despite the fact that much has been written recently on the subject, 1 there is, as yet, no clear agreement as to the meaning of 'globalization'. Jacques offers a useful summary:

Although this trend toward globalisation is most obviously economically driven, it cannot be reduced to the economic either in its causes or in its effects. Take, for example, the growth of an increasingly international culture, with the spread of satellite television or the growth of English as an international language.

We live in an era in which Paris, with the opening of the Channel Tunnel, could feel as close to London as Manchester; when events in a far part of the globe can be brought live to your sitting room; when foreign travel including to Third World destinations has become commonplace; when a nuclear meltdown in one country affects a whole continent; when the corruption of oceans can affect the balance of our planet's ecosystem. In short, globalisation is accompanied by a new sense of global intimacy and interdependence. 2

The lack of any specific definition of globalization makes it increasingly difficult to contrast various perspectives. However, the debate has moved on significantly since Marshall McLuhan introduced us to the idea of the 'global village'. For McLuhan, technological developments have created an interconnected globe, in

-83-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dimensions of Global Citizenship: Political Identity beyond the Nation-State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables viii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • 1 - The Rediscovery of Citizenship 1
  • 2 - Citizenship and the Nation-State 28
  • 3 - World Citizenship 54
  • 4 - Modernity, Globality and Globalization 83
  • 5 - Global Citizenship 117
  • 6 - Global Citizenship as Organizational Practice 140
  • 7 - The Construction of Political Identity 167
  • 8 - Globality and Everyday Life 185
  • 9 - The Dimensions of Global Citizenship 211
  • 10 - Active Citizenship Today 239
  • Bibliography 259
  • Index 275
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 285

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.