Implementing International Humanitarian Law: From the Ad Hoc Tribunals to a Permanent International Criminal Court

By Yusuf Aksar | Go to book overview

7

Concluding Remarks

The international community has witnessed many human rights violations which have also constituted violations of international humanitarian law throughout the twentieth century. After the Second World War the nature of armed conflicts and the method of warfare have changed remarkably; armed conflicts mainly become internal or internationalised in character, and civilians and civilian objects are often targeted. Two of the worst violations of human rights and of international humanitarian law occurred in the territories of the former Yugoslavia and in Rwanda in the last decade of the twentieth century. There cannot be any doubt that the situations in the former Yugoslavia and in Rwanda constituted threats to international peace and security.The large-scale killings, rape and other forms of sexual violence, 'ethnic cleansing', genocide and other types of crimes committed in these two regions of the world impelled the international community to bring those responsible for such crimes to justice.To achieve this purpose and to contribute to the maintenance of international peace and security, the only way was to establish an international criminal tribunal by means of a Security Council Resolution which was in compliance with the urgency of the events that had occurred in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. With this background, the UN Security Council established the ICTY and the ICTR acting under Chapter VII of the UN Charter 'to do justice, to deter further crimes, and to contribute to the restoration and main-tenance of peace'. 1

In contrast to the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals, the ICTY and the ICTR were established neither by the victors as a 'victor's court or justice' nor by the parties involved in the conflict, but rather by the UN Security Council on behalf of the entire international community in order to protect international peace and security. For this reason, the establishment of these International Tribunals was innovative in character, and their establishment should be seen as a contemporary example of the application of international humanitarian law for enforcing individual responsibility when the violations of international humanitarian law and of human rights law occurred. 2

1. See Chapter 1, note 109.

2. See Chapter 1, note 110.

-267-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Implementing International Humanitarian Law: From the Ad Hoc Tribunals to a Permanent International Criminal Court
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.