British Politics, 1910-1935: The Crisis of the Party System

By David Powell | Go to book overview

1

Parties and politics in Edwardian Britain

The brief reign of Edward VII, from 1901 to 1910, was, politically speaking, a time of transition: recognisably Victorian in certain respects; in others suggesting more clearly the shape of things to come. The sense of change was partly symbolic. The death of Queen Victoria in 1901, at the beginning of a new century, was bracketed by the passing of two giants of the late Victorian political scene: Gladstone in 1898 and Lord Salisbury in 1903, the latter shortly after his resignation of the premiership the previous year. More substantively, at the general election of 1906, twenty years of Unionist supremacy were brought to an end in the Liberal landslide and the Labour party made its first significant breakthrough as a parliamentary force. But there was continuity as well as change. New issues - social welfare, tariffs, the problems of imperial and national defence - were coming to the fore, but older controversies - over religious education, Ireland or the House of Lords - still exerted a pull. The political structures of Edwardian Britain, though undergoing internal modification and responding to external pressure, were essentially those that had evolved in the course of the nineteenth century. The parliamentary and electoral conflicts of the Edwardian period represented a final flourishing of the late Victorian party system before it was plunged into a crisis of deepening severity after 1910. In order to understand the origins and nature of that crisis it is necessary first to examine the workings of the Edwardian political system in more detail, to consider the previous history of the Edwardian political parties and to survey the main trends of party politics prior to the two general elections of 1910 and the more serious conflicts of 1910-14.


The Edwardian political system

Edwardian Britain inherited from the Victorians a political system which, over the previous seventy years, had become steadily more representative but which was still far from completely democratic. Parliamentary government had been established during the constitutional struggles of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. By the early nineteenth century it had become clear that the elected members of the House of Commons would determine the fate of governments, even though ministers were appointed by the Crown and had considerable powers of patronage and influence at their disposal. As a result of the Reform

-10-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Politics, 1910-1935: The Crisis of the Party System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Parties and Politics in Edwardian Britain 10
  • 2 - The Crisis of Partisanship, 1910-14 34
  • 3 - The Crisis of War, 1914-18 58
  • 4 - Coalitionism and Party Politics, 1918-22 90
  • 5 - Three-Party Politics, 1922-4 117
  • 6 - Politicians and the Slump, 1924-31 142
  • 7 - Crisis Resolved: the 1930s and After 171
  • Conclusion 192
  • Notes 199
  • Further Reading 212
  • Index 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.