British Politics, 1910-1935: The Crisis of the Party System

By David Powell | Go to book overview

4

Coalitionism and party politics, 1918-22

The politics of the immediate post-war period were dominated by the Lloyd George Coalition and speculation about its future. Could the Coalition provide a permanent alternative to the 'normal' workings of the party system, or would it prove to be no more than a temporary interlude before the re-emergence of party politics in some more conventional form? If party politics did again become the norm, how would they differ from their pre-war pattern, and what, in particular, would be the 'impact of Labour' on the party system? 1 The answers to these questions were bound up with specific issues and problems in post-war political debate, and not least with the personality and politics of the prime minister, David Lloyd George. To understand the eventual fate of Lloyd George and the part played by the government he led in reshaping the party system it is necessary to examine in more detail the political context of these years and the reasons why Lloyd George's attempt to perpetuate the politics of coalitionism and national unity was ultimately doomed by developments external to the Coalition and by its disintegration from within.


The new political landscape

The politics of post-1918 still showed some contours of an older morphology, but they also lacked many familiar landmarks and were marked by a number of novel and even disturbing features. The general election of 1918 was itself a unique contest, held in unique circumstances. It was the first election to take place under the terms of the 1918 Representation of the People Act, consequently the first on the new electoral boundaries, the first in which women were eligible to vote and the first in which polling in all constituencies occurred on the same day (in this case 14 December). Its uniqueness, though, was not confined to the electoral process. The imbalance of forces between the government and its opponents was remarkable. Indeed, there was hardly any opposition in the sense of there being a coherent, credible alternative to the outgoing administration. Labour was fighting its first election as a fully independent party on a national basis, but was not a realistic challenger for office. The Asquithian Liberals fielded candidates in fewer than half the constituencies and likewise, on this occasion, were not a potential governing party. This distinguished 1918 even from other

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Politics, 1910-1935: The Crisis of the Party System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Parties and Politics in Edwardian Britain 10
  • 2 - The Crisis of Partisanship, 1910-14 34
  • 3 - The Crisis of War, 1914-18 58
  • 4 - Coalitionism and Party Politics, 1918-22 90
  • 5 - Three-Party Politics, 1922-4 117
  • 6 - Politicians and the Slump, 1924-31 142
  • 7 - Crisis Resolved: the 1930s and After 171
  • Conclusion 192
  • Notes 199
  • Further Reading 212
  • Index 215
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.