British Politics, 1910-1935: The Crisis of the Party System

By David Powell | Go to book overview

Further reading
There are two excellent historiographical surveys which cover the whole period: Martin Pugh, The Making of Modern British Politics, 1867-1945 (3rd edn, Oxford, 2002) and Robert Self, The Evolution of the British Party System, 1885-1940 (London, 2000). Other works which provide useful background are: John Davis, A History of Britain, 1885-1939 (London, 1999), P.F. Clarke, Hope and Glory: Britain 1900-1990 (London, 1996), Keith Robbins, The Eclipse of a Great Power: Modern Britain, 1870-1992 (London, 1994) and Arthur Marwick, A History of the Modern British Isles, 1914-1999 (Oxford, 2000). Two older works that remain extremely valuable are Charles Loch Mowat, Britain Between the Wars, 1918-1940 (London, 1968) and A.J.P. Taylor, English History, 1914-1945 (Oxford, 1965).
Much of the detailed material on individual parties has been referred to in the chapter notes. It may be helpful here to mention again the key texts, together with some additional items. On the Conservative party, the standard work is John Ramsden, The Age of Balfour and Baldwin, 1902-1940 (London, 1978). Other general surveys which cover the history of the Conservative party in the twentieth century include Robert Blake, The Conservative Party from Peel to Thatcher (London, 1985), John Charmley, A History of Conservative Politics, 1900-1996 (London, 1997) and Stuart Ball, The Conservative Party and British Politics, 1902-1951 (London, 1995). There are useful essays on various aspects of the party's history in Anthony Seldon and Stuart Ball (eds), Conservative Century: The Conservative Party Since 1900 (Oxford, 1994). Martin Pugh, The Tories and the People, 1885-1935 (Oxford, 1985) examines the development of popular Conservatism through a study of the Primrose League. On this theme, see also Neal R. McCrillis, The British Conservative Party in the Age of Universal Suffrage: Popular Conservatism, 1918-1929 (Ohio, 1998).
For the Liberals, the starting point in many ways is still the classic account by Trevor Wilson, The Downfall of the Liberal Party, 1914-1935 (London, 1966). P.F. Clarke, Lancashire and the New Liberalism (Cambridge, 1971) was another important work that formed part of the early debate about the reasons for the Liberal decline. Both writers in different ways stressed the essential health of the party before 1914, in contrast with George Dangerfield's account in The Strange Death of

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British Politics, 1910-1935: The Crisis of the Party System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Parties and Politics in Edwardian Britain 10
  • 2 - The Crisis of Partisanship, 1910-14 34
  • 3 - The Crisis of War, 1914-18 58
  • 4 - Coalitionism and Party Politics, 1918-22 90
  • 5 - Three-Party Politics, 1922-4 117
  • 6 - Politicians and the Slump, 1924-31 142
  • 7 - Crisis Resolved: the 1930s and After 171
  • Conclusion 192
  • Notes 199
  • Further Reading 212
  • Index 215
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