Decision-Making in Environmental Health: From Evidence to Action

By C. Corvalán; D. Briggs et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 9*


THE HEADLAMP APPROACH: A NEW MODEL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH DECISION-MAKING

9.1Information, decision-making and action

In a world in which the population is fast becoming increasingly urbanised, in which technological and economic development is happening apace, and in which the balance between environment and health is coming under increasing strain, there is a growing need for new approaches to environmental health decision-making which can help to protect and improve the health of people in all areas of the world. The HEADLAMP methodology is aimed at providing such an approach. It represents an attempt to develop and apply a new model of environmental health decision-making which can improve public health not just as a one-off initiative, but by establishing long-term partnership between those involved, and by providing a firm information base for debate, management and policy.

Several principles and assumptions underlie the HEADLAMP approach. First and foremost, those concerned must genuinely use information to guide and support their decisions-information must lead to action. Second, this information must be relevant, balanced and reliable; it must go beyond partiality and opinion and provide sound and defensible evidence for action. Third, the approach must be holistic-it needs to set decisions within the wider context of causes and effects, so that the actions taken can be co-ordinated and integrated effectively and problems can be dealt with collectively, rather than as a set of separate and very specific issues. Fourth, it must be proactive and preventative: it must help to detect problems before they become acute and it must help to take action which avoids, rather than merely ameliorates, adverse health effects and promotes positive health outcomes. Finally, it must be inclusive, in that it should actively and fairly involve all the stakeholders concerned in ways which help to build consensus about the actions that are needed.

Each of these principles and assumptions has many implications, and raises both conceptual and practical questions. In this final chapter, therefore,

*This chapter was prepared by D. Briggs, G. Zielhuis and C. Corvalán

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Decision-Making in Environmental Health: From Evidence to Action
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 278

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.