Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music

By Georgina Born; David Hesmondhalgh | Go to book overview

an emblematic moment when Bette Davis actually encounters and seems momentarily to question her own image in a mirror before setting out to shoot a composer. No less questioningly might a critical, postmodernist musicology confront the institutionalized history of Twentieth-Century Music. Wary of ideological snares, its authors long remained cautious about politically committed composers of the Left like Kurt Weill and Hanns Eisler, whose own experiences of American exile form a different, if related, story to the one sketched here. Meanwhile, anxiously deployed strategies of marginalizing scorn and self-critical apologetics generated a complex discursive accompaniment to the unmasking of high art in and as the popular culture it had long feared and despised. The trading of constructions of modernism between Stravinsky and Schoenberg against Rachmaninov and Korngold marked a significant stage in the decline and transformation of European music's “good old tradition” as part of it slipped out of the downtown concert hall and into the local cinema.


NOTES
1
Jean-François Lyotard, The Postmodern Explained to Children: Correspondence 1982–1985 (London: Turnaround, 1992), 15.
2
Ibid., 16.
3
See Andreas Huyssen, After the Great Divide: Modernism, Mass Culture and Postmodernism (London: Macmillan, 1988).
4
Sergei Bertensson and Jay Leyda, Sergei Rachmaninoff: A Lifetime in Music (New York: New York University Press, 1956), 351. I have adopted “Rachmaninov” as the most widely used transliteration; formerly current spellings of his name have been retained in quotations.
5
Rachmaninov's Prelude in C-sharp Minor is treated in scorching style in Theodor Adorno, Quasi una Fantasia: Essays on Modern Music, trans. Rodney Livingstone (London: Verso, 1992), 38–40.
6
Quoted in Bertensson and Leyda, Rachmaninoff, 363–64.
7
See Max Paddison, Adorno's Aesthetics of Music (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), 263–64, 269ff.
8
Bertensson and Leyda, Rachmaninoff, 309.
9
Ibid., 374.
10
See Stravinsky in Conversation with Robert Craft (London: Pelican Books, 1962), “Conversations with Igor Stravinsky, ” 55–56.
11
Theodor Adorno, Philosophy of Modern Music (a strict translation of the German title would be “Philosophy of New Music”), trans. Anne G. Mitchell and Wesley V. Bloomster (London: Sheed and Ward, 1973), 209.
12
The clearest formulation of that position had appeared in Stravinsky's Chronique de ma vie in 1936, reprinted as An Autobiography (London: Calder and Boyars Ltd., 1975), 53 (“I consider that music is, by its very nature, powerless to express anything at all….”).
13
Adorno, Philosophy of Modern Music, 181–82.

-160-

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Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - On Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music 1
  • Notes 47
  • Musical Belongings - Western Music and Its Low-Other 59
  • Notes 78
  • Race, Orientalism, and Distinction in the Wake of the “yellow Peril” 86
  • Notes 110
  • Bartók, the Gypsies, and Hybridity in Music 119
  • Notes 137
  • Modernism, Deception, and Musical Others: Los Angeles Circa 1940 143
  • Notes 160
  • Experimental Oriental - New Music and Other Others 163
  • Notes 183
  • Composing the Cantorate - Westernizing Europe's Other Within 187
  • Notes 207
  • East, West, and Arabesk 213
  • Notes 229
  • Scoring the Indian - Music in the Liberal Western 234
  • Notes 251
  • The Poetics and Politics of Pygmy Pop 254
  • Discography 275
  • Notes 276
  • International Times - Fusions, Exoticism, and Antiracism in Electronic Dance Music 280
  • Notes 301
  • The Discourse of World Music 305
  • Notes 320
  • Contributors 323
  • Index 327
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