Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music

By Georgina Born; David Hesmondhalgh | Go to book overview

musicians are justifiably acclaimed for their ability to see music from a very different perspective.” 55 The exact angles and lines of sight (or hearing ) of that “different perspective” (the same terms Zorn used to describe his love of Japan) continue to be left as an undefined, reductive, and implicit stereotype, and at the same time the overarching idea of difference continues to be romanticized, essentialized, and implemented in the attempt to enliven Western musics, be they classical, experimental, creative, or improvised . Meanwhile, the political dimension of that implied difference continues to go largely unexamined.

If such a forced reading, taken from the casual pen of a PR writer, seems just too forced, too tenuous, then think about the following explanation of the name of New Albion Records, a California-based company with a strong connection to the minimalist tradition: “As Sir Francis Drake, noted explorer and pirate, discovered California for the Elizabethan world, New Albion discovers new musical territories for the modern world. Then as now there are savages, pagans, exotic flora and fauna.” 56 Perhaps the context for such Orientalizing rhetoric has changed, but the rhetoric itself stays remarkably consistent : exoticism and savagery, exploration and discovery, the conquest of fresh aural geography. In the ears of new Western musics, the other continues to be effectively other.


NOTES
1
This chapter deals primarily with the American experimental tradition, to the exclusion of the contemporaneous European avant-garde tradition, though an analysis of the way that non-Western music is represented and instrumentalized in the work of Olivier Messiaen, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Mauricio Kagel, and Pierre Boulez is a necessary complement to this work.
2
Many well-known American composers, such as Aaron Copland, Elliott Carter, Samuel Barber, Virgil Thomson, and Roger Sessions, are normally categorized outside the experimental camp, for various reasons—Carter, for instance, comes more directly out of a European avant-garde lineage, while Copland is perhaps best thought of as an American neoromantic. Wilfrid Mellers argues vigorously for the inclusion of the more obscure composer Charles Griffes among his experimentalists ; see Mellers, Music in a New Found Land: Themes and Developments in the History of American Music (1965; reprint, London: Faber and Faber, 1987), 145–48.
3
Henry Cowell, New Musical Resources (1930; reprint, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996). Cage studied with Cowell at the New School for Social Research in New York in 1934, and he cited New Musical Resources and Mexican composer Carlos Chavez's Toward a New Music as especially influential to him.
4
Cage, “The Future of Music: Credo, ” in Silence (1973; reprint, Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1983), 6.
5
David Nicholls, American Experimental Music 1890–1940 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990); Alan Rich, American Pioneers: Ives to Cage and Beyond (London: Phaidon, 1995); Paul Griffiths, Modern Music: The Avant-Garde Since 1945

-183-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - On Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music 1
  • Notes 47
  • Musical Belongings - Western Music and Its Low-Other 59
  • Notes 78
  • Race, Orientalism, and Distinction in the Wake of the “yellow Peril” 86
  • Notes 110
  • Bartók, the Gypsies, and Hybridity in Music 119
  • Notes 137
  • Modernism, Deception, and Musical Others: Los Angeles Circa 1940 143
  • Notes 160
  • Experimental Oriental - New Music and Other Others 163
  • Notes 183
  • Composing the Cantorate - Westernizing Europe's Other Within 187
  • Notes 207
  • East, West, and Arabesk 213
  • Notes 229
  • Scoring the Indian - Music in the Liberal Western 234
  • Notes 251
  • The Poetics and Politics of Pygmy Pop 254
  • Discography 275
  • Notes 276
  • International Times - Fusions, Exoticism, and Antiracism in Electronic Dance Music 280
  • Notes 301
  • The Discourse of World Music 305
  • Notes 320
  • Contributors 323
  • Index 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.