Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music

By Georgina Born; David Hesmondhalgh | Go to book overview

Jimmy Rowles, Stan Getz Presents Jimmy Rowles, The Peacocks, Columbia/Sony CK52975 (1977; reissue 1994).

Pharoah Sanders, Karma, Impulse/MCA MCAD-39122 (1969; reissue 1992).

Until the End of the World (motion picture soundtrack), Warner Bros. W2 26707 (1991).

Zap Mama, Adventures in Afropea 1, Luaka Bop/Warner Bros. 9 45183–2 (1993).


NOTES

This is a shortened version of a paper first published in the Yearbook for Traditional Music, vol. 28 (1996), 1–35. It is dedicated to the memory of Colin Turnbull.

1
See Eric Pace, “Colin M. Turnbull, 69, Anthropologist and Author, ” New York Times, 1 August 1994.
2
Colin Turnbull, The Forest People (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1961); The Lonely African (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1962); The Mountain People (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1972).
3
Marcel Mauss, The Gift (1929; reprint, New York: W. W. Norton, 1976).
4
Colin Turnbull, Wayward Servants: The Two Worlds of the African Pygmies (New York: Natural History Press, 1965), especially 254–67, 286–91. All page references in the next paragraph are from Turnbull, Wayward Servants.
5
Jon Pareles, “Madonna Makes Her Next Career Move: Innocence, ” International Herald Tribune, 25 October 1994, 20.
6
Both quotations from ibid., 20.
7
Herbie Hancock, phone conversation with author, April 1985.
8
For historical perspectives on this issue see Roger Wallis and Krister Malm, Big Sounds from Small Peoples: The Music Industry in Small Countries (New York: Pendragon, 1984), 165–215; Anthony Seeger, “Singing Other People's Songs, ” Cultural Survival Quarterly 15, no. 3 (1991): 36–39; Seeger, “Ethnomusicology and Music Law, ” Ethnomusicology 36, no. 3 (1992): 345–59; and the essays in Simon Frith, ed., Music and Copyright (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1993).
9
On some of the dimensions of African American citation ethics and recycling across genres and styles, see Amiri Baraka, “The Blues Aesthetic and the Black Aesthetic , ” Black Music Research Journal 11, no. 2 (1991): 101–9; Paul Berliner, Thinking in Jazz: The Infinite Art of Improvisation (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994); Henry Louis Gates Jr., The Signifying Monkey (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988); Dick Hebdige, Cut 'n' Mix (New York: Methuen, 1987); Leroi Jones, Blues People (New York: William Morrow Monson, 1963); Tricia Rose, Black Noise (Hanover, N.H.: Wesleyan University Press, 1994). Especially provocative in this regard is Paul Gilroy's The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1993). Gilroy takes up the politics of authenticity in black music, approvingly citing Houston Baker, Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987), on the trope of “family” in African American consciousness: see Gilroy, The Black Atlantic, 72–110.
10
See for example the Thomas interviews in Joe H. Thomas, “Avant-Garde with Roots, ” Down Beat, 10 December 1970, 18–19; and Tyson Rawlings, “Africa Is Where I Am: Interview with Leon Thomas, ” Jazz and Pop 9, no. 11 (1970): 5–18.

-276-

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Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction - On Difference, Representation, and Appropriation in Music 1
  • Notes 47
  • Musical Belongings - Western Music and Its Low-Other 59
  • Notes 78
  • Race, Orientalism, and Distinction in the Wake of the “yellow Peril” 86
  • Notes 110
  • Bartók, the Gypsies, and Hybridity in Music 119
  • Notes 137
  • Modernism, Deception, and Musical Others: Los Angeles Circa 1940 143
  • Notes 160
  • Experimental Oriental - New Music and Other Others 163
  • Notes 183
  • Composing the Cantorate - Westernizing Europe's Other Within 187
  • Notes 207
  • East, West, and Arabesk 213
  • Notes 229
  • Scoring the Indian - Music in the Liberal Western 234
  • Notes 251
  • The Poetics and Politics of Pygmy Pop 254
  • Discography 275
  • Notes 276
  • International Times - Fusions, Exoticism, and Antiracism in Electronic Dance Music 280
  • Notes 301
  • The Discourse of World Music 305
  • Notes 320
  • Contributors 323
  • Index 327
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