Counseling Techniques: Improving Relationships with Others, Ourselves, Our Families, and Our Environment

By Rosemary A. Thompson | Go to book overview

Chapter3

Eclectic Techniques for Group Therapy
Many theorists such as Garfield and Bergin (1986), Corsini (1989), Andrews (1989), Kelly (1988), and Norcross (1986) collectively asserted that the rise of eclectic counseling and the development of meta-theoretical eclectic models are viewed as a pragmatic response to the wide range of client differences. Any single theory and associated counseling techniques are unlikely to be universally effective with increasingly diverse client populations that reflect an equally diverse array of support systems.Group counseling is an interpersonal process where members explore themselves in relationship to others in an attempt to modify their attitudes and behavior. Reality testing within the group gives the individual a unique behavior-modifying experience. Carroll and Wiggins (1990, p. 25) identified general goals for helping members in the group:
•Become a better listener.
• Develop sensitivity and acceptance of others.
• Increase self-awareness and develop a sense of identity.
• Feel a sense of belonging and overcome feelings of isolation.
• Learn to trust others as well as self.
• Recognize and state areas of belief and values without fear of repression.
• Transfer what is learned in the group to the outside by accepting responsibility for solving one's own problems.

In broad terms, four types of groups can be identified: (1) support groups including self-help groups of all kinds, which offer relief as opposed to change; (2) psychoeducational or skill-building groups aimed to induce change in social, emotional, and cognitive skills; (3) interpersonal groups that attempt to change

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