Playwriting: A Practical Guide for Students of All Ages

By Noël Greig | Go to book overview

Appendix A:

Adapting the work to the context
When I first started leading writing workshops, I had had no formal training as a teacher, mentor or workshop-leader. All I knew was - through having worked for years as actor, director and playwright - that there were certain useful underlying principles as to 'how stories are made', and that these could be passed on. The problem I saw - which in the end was no problem - was that I was being asked to work in a range of contexts whose participants had varying expectations, backgrounds and life-experiences. Schools and colleges, community-groups, special-needs groups, Lesbian and Gay groups, Black and Asian groups, total newcomers and fledgling professionals; all of whom, I thought, would require totally different approaches and methodologies. I was also rather daunted by the knowledge that, in terms of work in schools, there was a large body of theory regarding 'how children learn', some of which I was slightly aware of, but most of which I was ignorant of.I stumbled along for a while, feeling an utter fraud, though encouraged by the fact that people seemed to enjoy my presence in the room. I was struggling with 'the problem' - how to put together different sets of work for each different group? Then I had to lead a number of sessions with a variety of groups - ranging from a primary class to an advanced university course - in a very short period of days, with very little preparation time. I found myself presenting each group with the same set of exercises, thinking the game was up. What happened was - and it seems so obvious now, though it didn't then - that I came up with what have been my guiding principles when working with any group:
• Be aware of the general language-experience of the group: what their vocabulary-store is, what their linguistic skills are.

-198-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Playwriting: A Practical Guide for Students of All Ages
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Noël Greig iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xii
  • Acknowledgements xv
  • 1 - Getting Going and Warming Up 1
  • 2 - Theme 43
  • 3 - Issue 47
  • 4 - Building a Character 60
  • 5 - Finding the Story 86
  • 6 - Location 119
  • 7 - The Individual Voice 131
  • 8 - Second Draft 157
  • 9 - Performance Projects 193
  • Appendix A: 198
  • Appendix B: 200
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.