Moses and Egypt: The Documentation to the Motion Picture The Ten Commandments

By Henry S. Noerdlinger | Go to book overview

THE HISTORICAL PERIOD

IN the beginning were the Scriptures. From this beginning to the completion of the motion picture The Ten Commandments these sacred books served as our main guides.

In due time we had to set a date for the Exodus. The Scriptures did not give us one. Nor did they give us the name of the pharaoh of the oppression. The new ruler of Egypt "which knew not Joseph"1 and the one who led his mighty host of chariots in pursuit of the Israelites2 have remained nameless in these texts.

In making a motion picture such as The Ten Commandments, we do not find ourselves in the relatively comfortable position of the Egyptologist or Bible scholar who can satisfy himself with a vague answer to the problem at hand or, awaiting concrete evidence, no answer at all. A decision has to be reached. A precise historical period has to be established -- an actual pharaoh has to sit on the throne of Egypt. This is a motion picture. The characters who bring it to life must have actual names. They must live and perform in reality. An historical void cannot be portrayed on the screen.

The general and specific problem with which we deal here has received considerable attention by many learned men throughout many generations.

Among those who read the Bible in the literal

____________________
1
Ex. 1: 8.
2
Ex. 14:6 -- .

-5-

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Moses and Egypt: The Documentation to the Motion Picture The Ten Commandments
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgements iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • The Historical Period 5
  • Moses 11
  • The Pharaohs 49
  • The Men and Women Of the Bible 63
  • The Holy Scriptures 73
  • The Army 89
  • Of Camels, Horses And Transportation 95
  • Building and Other Arts And Crafts 101
  • Costumes And Adornments 125
  • Food And Entertainment 159
  • Postscript 167
  • Bibliography 169
  • Libraries and Museums Consulted 177
  • Index 179
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