Moses and Egypt: The Documentation to the Motion Picture The Ten Commandments

By Henry S. Noerdlinger | Go to book overview

MOSES

The Biblical Account

The story of Moses as it is written in the Bible is well known. There, the description of his early life is presented in a most abbreviated manner. A few short verses tell of his birth under the terror of Pharaoh's persecution,1 his exposure to the river by his worried mother,2 and his adoption into the royal family of Egypt.3 When Moses reaches manhood he kills an Egyptian and must leave Egypt abruptly.4

Starting with the scenes at the well in Midian, where Moses rescues Jethro's daughters,5 the Bible becomes more explicit. One arrives at the conclusion that the scriptural account of Moses is concerned, in the main, with the liberation of the Israelites in bondage,6 the giving of the Law and ordinances,7 the wandering in the wilderness, and the eventual approach to the Promised Land.8

Of foremost importance in these Bible chapters and unmistakably originating these events is God, Who as "the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob"9 familiarizes Moses with the tradition of his forefathers and, with His name YHWH -- I AM THAT I AM,10 or, as translated in the Douay Version, I AM WHO AM -- brings new meaning, new hope and a renewed religious faith to those distressed in bondage in Egypt. It becomes clear that the prime purpose of this biblical account is the establishment

____________________
1
Ex. 1:22; 2:2.
10
Ex. 3:14.
2
Ex. 2:3.
3
Ex. 2:10.
4
Ex. 2:12, 15.
5
Ex. 2:16-
6
Ex. 3:7-
7
Ex. 20-
8
Numbers, Deuteronomy.
9
Ex. 3:6.

-11-

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Moses and Egypt: The Documentation to the Motion Picture The Ten Commandments
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Acknowledgements iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • The Historical Period 5
  • Moses 11
  • The Pharaohs 49
  • The Men and Women Of the Bible 63
  • The Holy Scriptures 73
  • The Army 89
  • Of Camels, Horses And Transportation 95
  • Building and Other Arts And Crafts 101
  • Costumes And Adornments 125
  • Food And Entertainment 159
  • Postscript 167
  • Bibliography 169
  • Libraries and Museums Consulted 177
  • Index 179
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