Football Goes East: Business, Culture, and the People's Game in China, Japan, and South Korea

By Wolfram Manzenreiter; John Horne | Go to book overview

8

Government involvement in football in Korea

Chung Hongik


Introduction

This macro-functional study of football in Korea has three broad aims: assessing the current status of football at various levels, unraveling the pattern of government policy, and establishing the relationship between the status of football and government policy. Figure 8.1 is a schematic representation of the thought processes that were involved in the preparation of the present work.

The box on the left of Figure 8.1 contains five factors that are used to explain the nature and scope of government involvement in football, as well as the development and status of football within the country. The arrows within the figure indicate causal relationships among the variables, but they are not intended to demonstrate strict causality, as in the testing of a hypothesis. The intent here is only to show the general direction of flow of influence among the variables through an examination of historical records and recent data. First, let us take a brief look at the rationale for choosing the five factors in the box, by examining the effect each of them may have on sport policy. Their relationship with the development of football will be discussed later in the examination of the empirical data.

As in other policy areas, culture should also be a factor in government sport policy processes; government policies, for instance, would be closely related to a country's cultural tradition toward sport. For example, physical prowess was highly valued in societies where the majority of the ruling class consisted of warrior-aristocrats, as opposed to scholar-bureaucrats. During the course of modernization, those in the upper class influenced the emergence of modern sports, and

Figure 8.1 Analytic framework of government involvement in football

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