Russia: Tsarist and Communist

By Anatole G. Mazour | Go to book overview

8
The Reign of Alexis (1645-1676)

THE REIGN of the second Romanov, Alexis, who ascended the throne in 1645, witnessed important developments in both the foreign and the domestic affairs of Russia. In the realm of foreign affairs Russo-Polish relations remained the outstanding issue. Enough has been already said about internal developments in Russia during the preceding half-century which offered Poland favorable opportunities for expansion at the expense of her eastern neighbor. Large strategic areas settled by a population of predominantly Orthodox faith came under Polish rule. The Russo-Polish border became a heatedly contested question involving constant danger of war. On the other hand, within Poland it created a problem of a restless militant minority that tenaciously clung to its faith and native tongue and refused to be Romanized or Polonized. Together these constituted enough political and social explosive to keep eastern Europe in a continuous state of unrest. The revitalized policy of the Roman Church, which had seized the initiative in its effort to halt the tide of Protestantism, affected eastern Europe and sharpened already existing antagonisms until a spark might have set off a conflagration.

When the Counter-Reformation entered its campaign for the recovery of the sagging prestige of Rome in Poland, it came face to face with open revolt. The spear of Catholicism was the Jesuit Order, which aimed at eradicating Protestantism in eastern Europe. For a variety of reasons, not always motivated by religious sentiments, the Jesuit drive was supported by the Catholic elements of Poland. The crusade met with formidable resistance from the Orthodox communities which dominated the eastern portion of both Poland and Lithuania. The air, already charged with political and social tension was now further heated by religious antagonism, and matters reached a boiling point. In these circumstances the Orthodox population turned to Orthodox Moscow for aid. Since the fall of Constantinople, Moscow herself posed as the champion of Orthodoxy; those who even nominally owed allegiance to the patriach of Constantinople expected to receive aid from the mother church by way of its strongest member--Russia.


MOSCOW AND CONSTANTINOPLE

What followed in eastern Europe was a consequence of many centuries of church history. Moscow's aspirations for spiritual power had

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Russia: Tsarist and Communist
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 1000

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.