The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922

By Wendy Palace | Go to book overview

1

The Younghusband invasion, 1900-1904
The secret waits for the insight
of eyes unclouded by longing;
Those who are bounded by desire
see only the outward container.
from The Tao Te Ching by Lao Tzu

In 1900 Tibet was a 'waiting secret', an undefined region of exotic reputation and stark physical and climatic contrasts about which the British knew very little. In 1904 (the year that the Younghusband expedition finally entered the forbidden city of Lhasa), leading experts like Eric Teichman of the China Consular Service divided the country into three distinct zones, all subject to varying degrees of political control by the Dalai Lama's government in Lhasa and the Manchu government in Peking.

The first zone, where the Dalai Lama's spiritual and temporal power was uncontested and which Teichman called the kingdom of Tibet, extended north as far as Kokonor and east as far as the ancient Burmese frontier with China. Included in this zone were the states of Chamdo, Draya, and Nyarong, which had only recently reverted to direct Tibetan control after years of Chinese occupation. At Lhasa, the capital, the Manchu had installed a representative, or amban.

The second zone, known to the China Service as East Tibet and to the Tibetans themselves as Kham, included the states of Chala, Batang and Litang, which bordered China and which the Manchu claimed as part of their extensive empire. Within this zone lay the wealthy state of Derge which, like Chamdo, Draya and Nyarong, had also recently reverted to the political control of Lhasa. 1 The nature of Chinese political control in East Tibet was purely nominal since the Manchu took only a limited interest in what they regarded as the outer reaches of their Empire. The area had long ago been left to the provincial governments of Sichuan to administer and their interest in the region waxed and waned according to the whims of their successive viceroys. Except in Derge, the Dalai Lama could expect to exercise little political control in East Tibet and even here his spiritual

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Figures xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - The Younghusband Invasion, 1900-1904 1
  • 2 - Masterly Inactivity 15
  • 3 - Beyond the Frontier 36
  • 4 - Delicate Work 53
  • 5 - Revolution, Invasion and Independence 73
  • 6 - The Simla Conference and the Bipartite Settlement, 1912-1914 92
  • 7 - The China Service and East Tibet, 1914-1918 106
  • 8 - Lhasa Unveiled 126
  • Conclusion 143
  • Notes 150
  • Select Bibliography 180
  • Index 188
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 195

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.