The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922

By Wendy Palace | Go to book overview

Notes

1

The Younghusband invasion, 1900-1904

1
Eric Teichman, 'Introduction', Travels of a Consular Officer in Eastern Tibet, Cambridge, 1922.
2
The Gelug-pa or Yellow Hat sect were formed by Tsong Kapa (1357-1419), later reincarnated as the First Dalai Lama. Under the Fifth Dalai Lama (known as the Great Fifth), the older Red Hat order was driven out of central Tibet and their influence mainly restricted to eastern Tibet after 1656.
3
Minto Papers, MSS 12594, Satow to Curzon, 20/11/02.
4
When British expedition leader Augustus Margary was murdered near the Sino-Burmese border the Chinese were forced to agree to compensation, and as one of the conditions of the Chefoo Convention which followed in 1876 the Manchu had reluctantly agreed to issue passports to a British overland mission to Lhasa. This had eventually been followed up in 1886 when a mission under the leadership of Colman MacCaulay, organised by the Indian government, was cancelled on the eve of its departure. The situation was further complicated from the British side by the fact that Margary had been a member of the China Consular Service, leading to some friction with the Indian government. For more information about this see Sir John Jordan, The Journey of Augustus Raymond Margary from Shanghai to Bhamo and Back to Manwyene, Macmillan and Co. Ltd, London, 1876. W. Palace, 'Sir John Jordan and the Burma Border, 1906-12', Asian Affairs, Oct. 1999.
5
A good account of this early period of Tibetan history may be found in Christopher Beckwith's book, The Tibetan Empire in Central Asia: A History of the Struggle for Great Power among Tibetans, Turks, Arabs and Chinese During the Early Middle Ages, Princeton, N.J., 1987.
6
Aghvan Dorjiev was a Buriat from Eastern Siberia and, like the Dalai Lama, a member of the Gelug-pa sect. A distinguished scholar in his own right, he attended Drepung monastery in Lhasa during the 1860s. By 1890 he had risen to become a personal tutor to the young Thubten Gyatso. In spring 1900 he travelled to Odessa, via India, attracting the attention of the Indian government, and leading to speculation that he was working as a spy for the Russians. He remained the Thirteenth Dalai Lama's lifelong friend and adviser. In 1934 he fell victim to one of Stalin's persecutions and died in a Soviet prison in January 1938.
7
Kawaguchi wrote his own account of his travels which was published in English translation in 1909 as Three Years in Tibet, Kathmandu, Ratna Pustak Bhandar, 1979.
8
Chö-yön: 'chö', meaning deity; 'yön', meaning dispenser of offerings to religious persons. The cho-yon was a private arrangement between the Dalai Lamas and

-150-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The British Empire & Tibet 1900 - 1922
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Figures xi
  • Acknowledgements xii
  • 1 - The Younghusband Invasion, 1900-1904 1
  • 2 - Masterly Inactivity 15
  • 3 - Beyond the Frontier 36
  • 4 - Delicate Work 53
  • 5 - Revolution, Invasion and Independence 73
  • 6 - The Simla Conference and the Bipartite Settlement, 1912-1914 92
  • 7 - The China Service and East Tibet, 1914-1918 106
  • 8 - Lhasa Unveiled 126
  • Conclusion 143
  • Notes 150
  • Select Bibliography 180
  • Index 188
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 195

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.