Reality TV: Audiences and Popular Factual Television

By Annette Hill | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

Pet deaths

Some of the most popular types of reality programmes contain stories about humans and companion animals. There are observational formats such as Vets in Practice (BBC, 1994-), infotainment such as Animal Hospital (BBC, 1994-2004), and advice formats such as The Pet Psychic (Animal Planet, 2002-) or The Dog Listener (Channel 5, 2001-2002). There is even a cable TV channel targeted directly at pets; Miow TV includes visuals that appeal to cats, along with information for cat owners. Given the variety of reality formats for pets on television, the content is surprisingly similar: most formats are concerned with pets in crisis. In this chapter, I want to explore popular factual television concerned with the ill health, ill treatment, recovery, and, in extreme cases, death of companion animals. This chapter applies the concept of an ethics of care, as discussed in the previous chapter, to a case study of the content and reception of animal-based reality programmes. Programmes such as Animal Hospital are popular with family viewers, and regular viewers of these programmes tend to be mothers and children. When audiences talk about programmes such as Animal Hospital they frame their responses in relation to compassion and responsibility towards pets in the home, and socially acceptable treatment of pets. The stories of pets in crisis highlight the morally charged arena of human-animal relations, and mark the transformation of the cultural meaning of pets in the late twentieth century from 'lifestyle accessories' to valued 'members of the family'. In addition, such stories of pets in crisis raise ethical issues concerning the politics of suffering, and the politics of viewing suffering on television.


HUMAN--ANIMAL RELATIONS

The history of human-animal relations is a history of changing social attitudes and behaviour towards the co-existence of humans and animals within the natural world. Adrian Franklin, in his book Animals and Modern Culture, summarises the main theoretical approach to human-animal relations as follows:

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reality TV: Audiences and Popular Factual Television
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Chapter 1 - Understanding Reality TV 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Rise of Reality TV 14
  • Chapter 3 - The Reality Genre 41
  • Chapter 4 - Performance and Authenticity 57
  • Chapter 5 - The Idea of Learning 79
  • Chapter 6 - Ethics of Care 108
  • Chapter 7 - Pet Deaths 135
  • Chapter 8 - Story of Change 170
  • Appendix 1 194
  • Appendix 2 197
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 214
  • Index 224
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 231

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.